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Engineering News

From drones to phones, new tech is making gardening easier

This Feb. 10, 2013 photo provided by Dean Fosdick shows a hobby greenhouse in Langley, Wash., which was built in a sunny location capable of capturing an immense amount of summertime heat. It was later equipped with a timed irrigation system that automatically turns on early in the morning to water a wide assortment of potted plants. Smart devices are being introduced to make gardening less demanding and more efficient.(Dean Fosdick via AP) New technology is easing the way we…

Student Hyperloop motor tested at ESA

Dutch students due to compete in Elon Musk’s high-speed ‘Hyperloop’ challenge this July subjected their motor module to near-vacuum conditions within ESA’s ESTEC Test Centre in the Netherlands. The Delft Hyperloop team slid their test rig inside the Centre’s 3.5m-long and 2m-wide VTC-1.5 Space Simulator chamber to be operated for around half an hour at a time. Credit: ESA–G. Porter, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO Dutch students due to compete in Elon Musk’s high-speed ‘Hyperloop’ challenge this July subjected their motor…

Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest — ScienceDaily

Palaeontologists from University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin. UCC’s Dr Maria McNamara and her team studied the fossil cells, and dandruff from modern birds, with powerful electron microscopes for the study, published today in the journal Nature Communications. “The fossil cells are preserved with incredible detail — right down to the level of nanoscale keratin…

Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambers — ScienceDaily

Like humans, cells of the same species each have a distinct “personality.” When confronted with an external stimulus like a virus, they each secrete a different quantity of molecules and communicate with each other to a varying degree. Studies have already shown that two cells of the same type may not behave identically when subjected to the same treatment. In their quest to learn more, researchers from EPFL, working in collaboration with RMIT University in Australia and the University of…

4 Tips To Improve Your SaaS Service

In cloud computing, software as a service (SaaS) is probably the most famous category for a good reason. Virtually, it has eliminated the need for businesses to run programs locally or get custom-built programs, which tend to be cost-extensive. Most importantly, SaaS has enabled both small and large companies to compete on the same lane to scale their growth thanks to equal access to essential services. But, according to Totango, the SaaS industry experiences a churn rate of about 5…

Engineering Ethics Blog: Human And Autonomous Driving: A Deadly Mix?

“Who’s in charge here?”  If people in an organization can’t give a clear answer to that question, chances are the organization is in trouble.  And something along those lines may apply to cars as well as to human organizations.  That’s the lesson we can draw from the preliminary report released by the U. S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) last Thursday, May 24, concerning the fatal collision between a pedestrian and a semi-autonomous vehicle operated by Uber in Tempe, Arizona…

Novel method to grow elastic diamonds — ScienceDaily

Diamonds is the strongest naturally occurring material on Earth. It is also renowned for its incomparable properties, such as high stiffness, exceptional thermal conductivity, high chemical resistance, and high optical transparency. Although these remarkable properties of diamond make it highly desirable for many scientific and technological applications, progress has been slow due to its brittleness. A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has unveiled that brittle diamonds can be bent and stretched elastically when made into ultrafine needles. This breakthrough has…

Growing Citrus in the Snow » Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog

Growing Citrus in the Snow Posted on May 27, 2018  Comments (0) The system uses the constant ground temperature 8 feet below ground to heat a greenhouse. The temperature on his farm is 11 degrees (52 degrees Fahrenheit). Other nearby areas range from 9 to 17 degrees (17 is near a hot spring). Just circulating air through 64 meters (210 feet) of tubing buried 2.5 meters (8 feet) underground is enough to have citrus and other plants thrive. Selling at…

New method for finding disease-susceptibility genes — ScienceDaily

A new study, affiliated with UNIST has recently presented a novel statistical algorithm, capable of identifying potential disease genes in a more accurate and cost-effective way. This algorithm has also been considered as a new promising approach for the identification of candidate disease genes, as it works effectively with less genomic data and takes only a minute or two to get results. This breakthrough has been conducted by Professor Dougu Nam and his research team in the School of Life…

New materials, heated under high magnetic fields, could produce record levels of energy — ScienceDaily

Imagine being able to power your car partly from the heat that its engine gives off. Or what if you could get a portion of your home’s electricity from the heat that a power plant emits? Such energy-efficient scenarios may one day be possible with improvements in thermoelectric materials — which spontaneously produce electricity when one side of the material is heated. Over the last 60 years or so, scientists have studied a number of materials to characterize their thermoelectric…