Introducing Cron Triggers for Cloudflare Workers


Today the Cloudflare Workers team is thrilled to announce the launch of Cron Triggers. Before now, Workers were triggered purely by incoming HTTP requests but starting today you’ll be able to set a scheduler to run your Worker on a timed interval. This was a highly requested feature that we know a lot of developers will find useful, and we’ve heard your feedback after Serverless Week.

We are excited to offer this feature at no additional cost, and it will be available on both the Workers free tier and the paid tier, now called Workers Bundled. Since it doesn’t matter which city a Cron Trigger routes the Worker through, we are able to maximize Cloudflare’s distributed system and send scheduled jobs to underutilized machinery. Running jobs on these quiet machines is both efficient and cost effective, and we are able to pass those cost savings down to you.

What is a Cron Trigger and how might I use such a feature?

In case you’re not familiar with Unix systems, the cron pattern allows you to schedule jobs to run periodically at fixed intervals or at scheduled times. Cron Triggers in the context of Workers allow users to set time-based invocations for the job. These Workers happen on a recurring schedule, and differ from traditional Workers in that they do not fire on HTTP requests.

Most developers are familiar with the cron pattern and its usefulness across a wide range of applications. Pulling the latest data from APIs or running regular integration tests on a preset schedule are common examples of this.

“We’re excited about Cron Triggers. Workers is crucial to our stack, so using this feature for live integration tests will boost the developer experience.” – Brian Marks, Software Engineer at Bazaarvoice

How much does it cost to use Cron Triggers?

Triggers are included at no additional cost! Scheduled Workers count towards your request cap for both the free tier and Workers Bundled, but rest assured that there will be no hidden or extra fees. Our competitors charge extra for cron events, or in some cases offer a very limited free tier. We want to make this feature widely accessible and have decided not to charge on a per-trigger basis. While there are no limits for the number of triggers you can have across an account, note that there is a limit of 3 triggers per Worker script for this feature. You can read more about limits on Workers plans in this documentation.

How are you able to offer this feature at no additional cost?

Cloudflare supports a massive distributed system that spans the globe with 200+ cities. Our nodes are named for the IATA airport code that they are closest to. Most of the time we run Workers close to the request origin for performance reasons (ie SJC if you are in the Bay Area, or CDG if you are lucky enough to be in Paris 🥐🍷🧀).  In a typical HTTP Worker, we do this because we know that performance is of material importance when someone is waiting for the response.

In the case of Cron Triggers, where the user is running a task on a timed basis, those performance needs are different. A few milliseconds of extra latency do not matter as much when the user isn’t actively waiting for the response. The nature of the feature gives us much more flexibility on where to run the job, since it doesn’t have to necessarily be in a city close to the end user.

Cron Triggers are run on underutilized machines to make the best use of our capacity and route traffic efficiently. For example, a job scheduled from San Francisco at 7pm Pacific Time might be sent to Paris because it’s 4am there and traffic across Europe is low.  Sending traffic to these machines during quiet hours is very efficient, and we are more than happy to pass those cost savings down to you. Aside from this scheduling optimization, Workers that are called by Cron Triggers behave similarly to and have all of the same performance and security benefits as typical HTTP Workers.

What’s happening below the hood?

At a high level, schedules created through our API create records in our database. These records contain the information necessary to execute the Worker on the given cron schedule. These records are then picked up by another service which continuously evaluates the state of our edge and distributes the schedules among cities. Once the schedules have been distributed to the edge, a service running in the node polls for changes to the schedules and makes sure they get sent to our runtime at the appropriate time.

If you want to know more details about how we implemented this feature, please refer to the technical blog.

What’s coming next?

With this feature, we’ve expanded what’s possible to build with Workers, and further simplified the developer experience. While Workers previously only ran on web requests, we believe the future of edge computing isn’t strictly tied to HTTP requests and responses.  We want to introduce more types of Workers in the future.

We plan to expand out triggers to include different types, such as data or event-based triggers. Our goal is to give users more flexibility and control over when their Workers run. Cron Triggers are our first step in this direction. In addition, we plan to keep iterating on Cron Triggers to make edge infrastructure selection even more sophisticated and optimized — for example, we might even consider triggers that allow our users to run in the most energy-efficient data centers.

How to try Cron Triggers

Cron triggers are live today! You can try it in the Workers dashboard by creating a new Worker and setting up a Cron Trigger.



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