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Category: Petroleum Engineering

a novel nanomaterial delivers top performance in extreme situations, as demonstrated by TU Wien (Vienna) with international partners — ScienceDaily

You can lubricate a bicycle chain with oil, but what do you do with a Mars rover or a red-hot conveyor belt in the steel industry? Very special nanomaterials have now been studied by the TU Wien together with research groups from Saarbrücken (Germany), Purdue University in the USA and the Universidad de Chile (Santiago, Chile). The material class of MXenes (pronounced “maxene”) has caused quite a stir in recent years in connection with novel battery technologies. But it now…

Biorobotics lab builds submersible robot snake

Credit: Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon University’s acclaimed snake-like robot can now slither its way underwater, allowing the modular robotics platform to inspect ships, submarines and infrastructure for damage. A team from the Biorobotics Lab in the School of Computer Science’s Robotics Institute tested the Hardened Underwater Modular Robot Snake (HUMRS) last month in the university’s pool, diving the robot through underwater hoops, showing off its precise and smooth swimming, and demonstrating its ease of control. “We can go places…

Why cities planning to spend billions on light rail should look again at what buses can do

Credit: Shutterstock Many cities in Australia and around the world have recently made or proposed investments in new light rail systems. They often do so in the belief this will not only increase public transport use, but also lead urban renewal and improve a city’s global image. However, compared to light rail, my research shows a system of buses running along dedicated corridors, known as bus rapid transit, has many advantages for Adelaide (the focus of my research) and cities…

ThermoBots: Microrobots on the water

A laser-controlled microrobot floating on the water’s surface. Credit: Franco N. Piñan Basualdo This research project was originated from the collaboration between two institutions with their respective expertise: The TIPs laboratory of the ULB, in Belgium, which is a group dedicated to the study of transport phenomena and fluid interfaces, and the AS2M department of the FEMTO-ST institute, in France, specialized in microrobotics. And thus, ThermoBot was born, a new kind of manipulation platform working on the air-water interface. ThermoBot…

A seven-point plan to tackle the world’s biggest cooling challenge

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain The COVID-19 logistics response could be the biggest, single refrigeration challenge the world has ever faced. Cold chains are energy intensive and rely on refrigerants, often with high Global Warming Potential (GWP). Sustainable cold chains that use novel technologies can unlock modal shifts and allow us to think about opportunities in broader temperature opportunities. This opens the door to developing a lasting COVID-19 cold chain legacy that is both resilient and sustainable. Professor Toby Peters, University…

What it takes to unwedge a megaship

Credit: Suez Canal Authority One of the world’s largest container ships, named Ever Given, has been wedged across the Suez Canal since it was blown off course by high winds in the early hours of March 23, blocking one of the busiest maritime trade corridors in the world. The incident has created a logjam of hundreds of tankers, the operators of which are now weighing up whether to wait for the stranded container ship to be cleared, or whether rerouting…

Carbonized plants contain harmful free radicals — ScienceDaily

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress at the cellular level. Research shows that this way, amongst others, they inhibit the germination capacity of plants, produce cytotoxins or exert toxic effects on aquatic invertebrates. Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) are potential precursors of ROS because they can react with water to form these radical species. “Therefore, EPFR are associated with harmful effects on the ecosystem and human health,” explains Gabriel Sigmund, the lead investigator of the study. “Our study shows…

New tool finds and fingerprints previously undetected PFAS compounds in watersheds on Cape Cod — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) found large quantities of previously undetectable compounds from the family of chemicals known as PFAS in six watersheds on Cape Cod using a new method to quantify and identify PFAS compounds. Exposures to some PFAS, widely used for their ability to repel heat, water, and oil, are linked to a range of health risks including cancer, immune suppression, diabetes, and low infant birth weight. The new…

Meet Shubhra Gangopadhyay – University of Missouri College of Engineering

Sometimes, before you can think big, you have to think small. After all, you can’t tackle the big problems without interacting with the microscopic molecules, electrons and atoms that make up our world. Meet Shubhra Gangopadhyay, professor, researcher and inventor of teeny-tiny technologies. Gangopadhyay has built a career around detecting and interacting with nanoparticles. Today, she is C.W. LaPierre Endowed Chair Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Co-Director of the Center for Nano/Micro Systems and…

New highly radioactive particles found in Fukushima — ScienceDaily

The 10 year anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident occurs in March. Work just published in the Journal ‘Science of the Total Environment’ documents new, large (> 300 micrometers), highly radioactive particles that were released from one of the damaged Fukushima reactors. Particles containing radioactive cesium (134+137Cs) were released from the damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) during the 2011 nuclear disaster. Small (micrometer-sized) particles (known as CsMPs) were widely distributed, reaching as far as…