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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

Before the pandemic, the lab of Stanford University biochemist Peter S. Kim focused on developing vaccines for HIV, Ebola and pandemic influenza. But, within days of closing their campus lab space as part of COVID-19 precautions, they turned their attention to a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Although the coronavirus was outside the lab’s specific area of expertise, they and their collaborators have managed to construct and test a promising vaccine candidate. “Our goal is to make…

Fighting the good fight against bacteria — ScienceDaily

Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathogen without damaging the good bacteria that bolsters the immune system. Medina, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering,…

LSU engineering students design prosthetic for high school student

James Robert III, who was born with half of a palm and no fingers on his left hand, had a prosthetic designed and built by LSU Engineering students. Credit: LSU College of Engineering It’s incredible the chain of events that a chance meeting can set off. When LSU Kinesiology Professor of Professional Practice and Athletic Training Program Director Ray Castle stopped by Catholic High School to visit with its head athletic trainer, Eddie Breight, he didn’t know he would meet…

Engineers develop soft robotic gripper

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists often look to nature for cues when designing robots—some robots mimic human hands while others simulate the actions of octopus arms or inchworms. Now, researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering have designed a new soft robotic gripper that draws inspiration from an unusual source: pole beans. While pole beans and other twining plants use their touch-sensitive shoots to wrap themselves around supports like ropes and rods to grow upward, the UGA team’s…

Diet modifications – including more wine and cheese – may help reduce cognitive decline –

The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years. This is the key finding of an Iowa State University research study spotlighted in an article published in the November 2020 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. The study was spearheaded by principal investigator, Auriel Willette, an assistant professor in Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Brandon Klinedinst, a Neuroscience PhD candidate working in the Food Science and Human Nutrition department at…

For the first time, researchers describe how Rho protein really stops gene expression — ScienceDaily

New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now — precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off. The finding concerns a key process essential to life: the transcription phase of gene expression, which enables cells to live and do their jobs. During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase wraps itself around the double helix of DNA, using one strand to match…

FRESH Technique for Bioprinting Lifelike Heart Models

Researchers have developed a way to 3D print a full-size model of a patient’s heart. Produced at Carnegie Mellon University by Professor Adam Feinberg and his team in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, the full-size 3D bioprinted human heart model uses a novel method, known as the Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) technique. The 3D bioprinting technique was invented in Feinberg’s lab to fill an unfilled demand for 3D printed soft polymers, which…

Sensor for smart textiles survives washing machine, cars and hammers

A close-up view of the sensor’s patterned conductive carbon fibers. The fibers are sandwiched between two prestrained elastic substrates. The overall electrical conductivity of the sensor changes as the edges of the patterned carbon fiber come out of contact with each other. Credit: James Weaver/Harvard SEAS Think about your favorite t-shirt, the one you’ve worn a hundred times, and all the abuse you’ve put it through. You’ve washed it more times than you can remember, spilled on it, stretched it,…

Mizzou Engineer Part of Team Working to Restore Organ Function

A Mizzou Engineer is part of an interdisciplinary team from across the country selected to study the lower urinary tract in hopes of restoring bladder function to those who suffer from urinary incontinence. About 50% of women and 25% of men suffer from bladder dysfunction. Giovanna Guidoboni, a professor in electrical engineering and computer science, will specifically focus on mathematically modeling how the nervous system interacts with the biomechanics of the bladder and the fluid dynamics of urine flow to…

Carbon-based materials that can be used as electrodes compatible with CMOS circuitry

An on-chip carbonized electrode microstructure from a scanning electron microscope. Credit: ORNL, U.S. Dept. of Energy Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee designed and demonstrated a method to make carbon-based materials that can be used as electrodes compatible with a specific semiconductor circuitry. The work bridges nanoscale 3-D printing and widely available processes for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor, or CMOS, technologies to enable biosensors for biomedical applications. 3-D printing electrodes on CMOS circuitry from a polymer precursor…