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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Simpler test that can be done in doctor’s office offers results in 30 minutes — ScienceDaily

An improved urine-testing system for people suffering from kidney stones inspired by nature and proposed by researchers from Penn State and Stanford University may enable patients to receive results within 30 minutes instead of the current turnaround time of a week or more. Kidney stones occur due to buildup of certain salts and minerals that form crystals, which in turn stick together and enlarge to form a hard mass in the kidneys. The stones move into the urinary tract and…

Controlling spatter during laser powder bed fusion found to reduce defects in metal-based 3-D printing

Complex laser powder absorptivity. (A) Absorptivity plot showing the conduction (low power) to keyhole (high power) transition for a bare plate (SS316L, Gaussian laser spot size D4σ = 60 μm, and scan speed 1.5 m/s). Adding 35-μm-thick powder improves absorptivity at low power. That the simulation data overlap at higher power (beyond the dotted vertical blue line) with and without powder indicates that powder becomes less relevant. (B) Simulation captures the linear relationship between melt pool depth and power. (C…

A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires — ScienceDaily

Writing in the journal NanoResearch, a team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports this week that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. The sensor uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. More than 30 years ago, senior author and microbiologist Derek Lovley discovered Geobacter in river mud. The microbes grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale “wires” to transfer charges for…

Rahhal Recipient of 2020 MU Study Abroad Teaching Excellence Award

Tojan Rahhal, assistant dean for inclusive excellence and strategic initiatives and an adjunct professor of Biomedical, Biological and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering, is among two recipients of the inaugural MU Study Abroad Teaching Excellence Award. Open to faculty in all academic disciplines, this award recognizes the exceptional and meaningful work carried out by faculty in global teaching, student learning and curriculum design for MU faculty-led study abroad programs. Dr. Robert Sites with the College of Food, Agriculture…

Focused ultrasound opening brain to previously impossible treatments — ScienceDaily

University of Virginia researchers are pioneering the use of focused ultrasound to defy the brain’s protective barrier so that doctors could, at last, deliver many treatments directly into the brain to battle neurological diseases. The approach, the researchers hope, could revolutionize treatment for conditions from Alzheimer’s to epilepsy to brain tumors — and even help repair the devastating damage caused by stroke. Richard J. Price, PhD, of UVA’s School of Medicine and School of Engineering, is using focused soundwaves to…

A highly performing and efficient e-skin for robotic applications

The H-1 robot covered with the electronic skin developed by the researchers. Credit: A. Eckert / TUM. Researchers at Technische Universität München in Germany have recently developed an electronic skin that could help to reproduce the human sense of touch in robots. This e-skin, presented in a paper published in MDPI’s Sensors journal, requires far less computational power than other existing e-skins and can thus be applied to larger portions of a robot’s body. “Our main motivation for developing the…

Heparin, a potent anti-coagulant and the most prescribed drug in hospitals, is currently produced in pigs — ScienceDaily

In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), University of California San Diego researchers moved one step closer to the ability to make heparin in cultured cells. Heparin is a potent anti-coagulant and the most prescribed drug in hospitals, yet cell-culture-based production of heparin is currently not possible. In particular, the researchers found a critical gene in heparin biosynthesis: ZNF263 (zinc-finger protein 263). The researchers believe this gene regulator is a key discovery…

Breakthrough in unlocking genetic potential of ocean microbes — ScienceDaily

Researchers have made a major breakthrough in developing gene-editing tools to improve our understanding of one of the most important ocean microbes on the planet. The international project, co-led by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK, unlocks the potential of the largest untapped genetic resource for the development of natural products such as novel antibacterial, antiviral, anti-parasitic and antifungal compounds. Ocean microbes regulate global cycles of carbon and essential nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus.…

Using sponges to wipe out cancer — ScienceDaily

A sponge found in Manado Bay, Indonesia, makes a molecule called manzamine A, which stops the growth of cervical cancer cells, according to a recent publication in the Journal of Natural Products submitted by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and their collaborators. Collaborators include students and investigators at the University of South Carolina (UofSC), College of Charleston, Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and the University of Malaya in Malaysia. The American Cancer Society estimates that there…

New quantum technology could help diagnose and treat heart condition — ScienceDaily

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart condition that causes an irregular and abnormally fast heart rate, potentially leading to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. While the causes of AF are unknown, it affects around one million people in the UK with cases predicted to rise at a great cost to the NHS. Currently, AF is commonly diagnosed using an electrocardiogram (ECG), but this can only be done during an episode, so complementary means of diagnosis are…