.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Biomedical Engineering

Researchers have theorized a coating that mimics the unique nanostructure could improve virus repellent face masks — ScienceDaily

Through the investigation of insect surfaces, Penn State researchers have detailed a previously unidentified nanostructure that can be used to engineer stronger, more resilient water repellent coatings. The results of this research were published today (July 17) in Science Advances. With an enhanced ability to repel droplets, this design could be applied to personal protective equipment (PPE) to better resist virus-laden particles, such as COVID-19, among other applications. “For the past few decades, conventionally designed water repellent surfaces have usually…

Never fall again thanks to backpack-like wearable robot

Credit: Delft University of Technology Balance aids currently used in daily life and rehabilitation clinics are helpful but far from perfect. Canes, walkers, crutches, and handrails modify posture and prevent the hands from being used during activities like opening doors, carrying shopping, or answering the telephone. Also more sophisticated tools like mobile bodyweight support systems or robotic gait trainers are bulky or can only be used in specific environments. Andrew Berry, Daniel Lemus and Saher Jabeen, researchers BioMechanical Engineering at…

Keller Receives Top Award from IEEE

Jim Keller sports a signature Hawaiian shirt in Southern Spain, where he attended a conference in Cadiz. Keller, a Curators’ Distinguished Professor, has received a top award from IEEE.   Jim Keller—an emeritus professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science—has received a top award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the world’s largest technical professional organization. It’s not surprising. Keller is a Curators’ Distinguished Professor, the highest designation a faculty member at Mizzou can earn.…

Bizarre saber-tooth predator from South America was no saber-tooth cat — ScienceDaily

A new study led by researchers from the University of Bristol has shown that not all saber-tooths were fearsome predators. Saber-tooth cats, such as the North American species Smilodon fatalis, are among the most iconic fossil animals with a reputation for being fierce predators. However, saber-tooths came in all shapes and sizes and nearly a hundred different saber-tooths are known to science so far. Thylacosmilus atrox (which means ‘terrible pouched knife’) is a well-known animal that lived around five million…

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

Credit: University of Michigan Tiny wireless sensors for recycled N95 masks could verify, in real time, whether the respirators are being exposed to proper decontamination conditions. They’re being developed and tested at the University of Michigan through a new National Science Foundation RAPID COVID-19 grant. The batteryless sensors are designed to provide more accurate and less cumbersome monitoring during the decontamination of protective masks for medical workers. In an effort to ensure availability of N95 masks when supplies are still…

Measuring a tiny quasiparticle is a major step forward for semiconductor technology — ScienceDaily

A team of researchers led by Sufei Shi, an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has uncovered new information about the mass of individual components that make up a promising quasiparticle, known as an exciton, that could play a critical role in future applications for quantum computing, improved memory storage, and more efficient energy conversion. Published today in Nature Communications, the team’s work brings researchers one step closer to advancing the development of semiconductor devices…

Sound waves transport droplets for rewritable lab-on-a-chip devices

Droplets of different sizes sit on grids of transducers that vibrate to create tunnels in a thin layer of oil, which can transport the droplets in multiple directions. Credit: Duke University Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a versatile microfluidic lab-on-a-chip that uses sound waves to create tunnels in oil to touchlessly manipulate and transport droplets. The technology could form the basis of a small-scale, programmable, rewritable biomedical chip that is completely reusable to enable on-site diagnostics or laboratory research.…

Bioactive inks printed on wearable textiles can map conditions over the entire surface of the body

A T-shirt screen printed with pH sensitive bio-active inks can provide a map of pH response on the wearer. Variations of bio-active inks can detect other molecules released by the body, or in the surrounding environment. Credit: Tufts University Researchers at Tufts University’s School of Engineering have developed biomaterial-based inks that respond to and quantify chemicals released from the body (e.g. in sweat and potentially other biofluids) or in the surrounding environment by changing color. The inks can be screen…

Research finds obese kids under lockdown in Italy ate more junk food, watched more TV at expense of physical activity — ScienceDaily

Lockdowns implemented across the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic have negatively impacted diet, sleep and physical activity among children with obesity, according to University at Buffalo research. The study, published in April in Obesity, examined 41 overweight children under confinement throughout March and April in Verona, Italy. Compared to behaviors recorded a year prior, the children ate an additional meal per day; slept an extra half hour per day; added nearly five hours per day in front of phone,…

Simpler test that can be done in doctor’s office offers results in 30 minutes — ScienceDaily

An improved urine-testing system for people suffering from kidney stones inspired by nature and proposed by researchers from Penn State and Stanford University may enable patients to receive results within 30 minutes instead of the current turnaround time of a week or more. Kidney stones occur due to buildup of certain salts and minerals that form crystals, which in turn stick together and enlarge to form a hard mass in the kidneys. The stones move into the urinary tract and…