.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Aerospace Engineering

Meeting the Demands of Today’s Test & Measurement Applications

As in other industries, digitalization is transforming electronic test and measurement. Advances in technologies such as 5G, the industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), Industry 4.0, cloud computing, advanced analytics, and more are driving this accelerating trend. For example, 5G technology plays an important role in virtualization and automation—two long-term trends in test and measurement (T&M). Along with these factors, increased adoption of modular equipment and consumer electronics makes the test and measurement industry more important than ever. As test and…

New mathematical tool can select the best sensors for the job

Credit: CC0 Public Domain In the 2019 Boeing 737 Max crash, the recovered black box from the aftermath hinted that a failed pressure sensor may have caused the ill-fated aircraft to nose dive. This incident and others have fueled a larger debate on sensor selection, number and placement to prevent the reoccurrence of such tragedies. Texas A&M University researchers have now developed a comprehensive mathematical framework that can help engineers make informed decisions about which sensors to use and where…

NASA monitors carbon monoxide from California wildfires — ScienceDaily

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured carbon monoxide plumes coming from California wildfires last week. There were 28 major wildfires burning across the state as of Sept. 14. This includes the August Complex Fire, which started on Aug. 17 and has since burned over 471,000 acres, making it the largest fire on record in California. The animation shows three-day averages of carbon monoxide concentrations around 3 miles (5 kilometers) up in the atmosphere between Sept. 6…

Kluever Named Kemper Fellow – University of Missouri College of Engineering

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professor Craig Kluever Craig Kluever, professor and director of undergraduate studies for the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE), was awarded a 2020 William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence. “I am honored and humbled by this award,” Kluever said. “Throughout my career I’ve tried to keep students engaged in the classroom, and I’ve found that including real engineering systems into homework and lectures helps. Who doesn’t want to analyze and design jet and rocket engines,…

Aiming for the Moon and Beyond

MAE student Mark Magnante As a child, Mark Magnante was interested in everything related to space. Growing up in California, movies were also a huge part of his childhood and influenced him greatly. “Seeing movies like ‘Star Wars’ in theaters when it was released made my imagination just run crazy with dreams of the stars,” Magnante said. “Growing up and seeing America’s history and prospective future in space, I just knew I wanted to be a part of that.” A…

Deep channels link ocean to Antarctic glacier — ScienceDaily

Newly discovered deep seabed channels beneath Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica may be the pathway for warm ocean water to melt the underside of the ice. Data from two research missions, using aircraft and ship, are helping scientists to understand the contribution this huge and remote glacier is likely to make to future global sea level rise. Researchers from UK and US International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration (ITGC), collected data from the glacier and adjoining Dotson and Crosson ice shelves during…

Flying a Jetpack near LAX

  But that’s just what somebody did last Sunday afternoon, in the sky over Cudahy, California, a one-square-mile town about eighteen miles (29 km) east of the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).  Two pilots spotted the person at an altitude of about 3000 feet (914 meters).  Flight controllers were inclined to doubt the credibility of the American Airlines pilot who saw the flyer first, but then it was confirmed by a Southwest pilot a few minutes later.  One plane came…

Park Elected to Fellow in ASME

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professor Chanwoo Park Chanwoo Park, associate professor and director of the Heat Transfer/Sustainable Energy Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE), was elected to the grade of “Fellow” in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). ASME is an international non-profit organization comprised of more than 100,000 members in 140+ countries. It promotes collaboration, career enrichment and skills development across all engineering disciplines. ASME’s membership includes college students, early-career professionals in engineering, researchers…

Revised code could help improve efficiency of fusion experiments — ScienceDaily

An international team of researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has upgraded a key computer code for calculating forces acting on magnetically confined plasma in fusion energy experiments. The upgrade will be part of a suite of computational tools that will allow scientists to further improve the design of breakfast-cruller-shaped facilities known as stellarators. Together, the three codes in the suite could help scientists bring efficient fusion reactors closer to reality. The…

Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient Mars — ScienceDaily

A new study from The University of Texas at Austin is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago. The study, published in Geology, represents the first time that researchers have quantified the precipitation that must have been present across the planet, and it comes out as the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover is making its way to the…