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Author: engineering

Earthquake engineers conduct research on steel collectors

Robert Fleischman and members of his research team stand dwarfed by a test structure built on the shake table at UC San Diego’s Englekirk Structural Engineering Center. Credit: University of Arizona An award-winning team of researchers at the University of Arizona and partnering universities is working to develop buildings that will not collapse under the force of major earthquakes, such as last year’s 7.1-magnitude quake in central Mexico and 7.3-magnitude quake near the Iran-Iraq border. The two earthquakes were the…

Lessons learned from adding Site Search 360 on Cloudflare Apps

This is a guest post by David Urbansky, CEO and Co-Founder of SEMKNOX and Site Search 360. David is a search enthusiast having built natural language search experiences for e-commerce sites and recipe search engines. As a startup founder, there are always key product decisions to be made when Site Search 360, our key product, is embedded in one context versus another. I’d like to share some experiences, choices, and challenges in our process packaging Site Search 360 for Cloudflare…

Four lessons in making Pinterest faster on Android – Pinterest Engineering – Medium

Arla Rosenzweig & Lin Wang | Performance TPM, Performance engineer As engineers, we intuitively know that a faster app is a better experience for Pinners, but we also have proof that when web pages load faster, user growth improves. Last year, we doubled down on performance across our platforms so that wherever our 200 million monthly active users were around the world, and regardless of their device, Pinterest would help them discover and do what they love — hopefully without waiting too…

Method to precisely determine when cell has ‘cashed’ RNA ‘checks’ written by active genes — ScienceDaily

DNA has often been called “the book of life,” but this popular phrase makes some biologists squirm a bit. True, DNA bears our genes, which spell out the instructions our cells use to make proteins — those workhorse molecules that comprise our physical being and make just about everything in life possible. But the precise relationship between the protein “blueprints” encoded in genes and the amount of protein a given cell actually makes is by no means clear. When a…

The magic of movies not tied to using latest technology according to new research — ScienceDaily

In the nearly 60 years between the 1939 release of Hollywood’s first animated movie, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and modern hits like Toy Story, Shrek and more, advances in animation technology have revolutionized not only animation techniques, but moviemaking as a whole. However, a new study in the INFORMS journal Organization Science found that employing the latest technology doesn’t always ensure creative success for a film. In his study, “Drawing Snow White and Animating Buzz Lightyear: Technological Toolkits…

Superconducting synapse may be missing piece for ‘artificial brains’ — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a superconducting switch that “learns” like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain. The NIST switch, described in Science Advances, is called a synapse, like its biological counterpart, and it supplies a missing piece for so-called neuromorphic computers. Envisioned as a new type of artificial intelligence, such computers could boost perception and decision-making for applications such as…

Scientists get better numbers on what happens when electrons get wet — ScienceDaily

There’s a particular set of chemical reactions that governs many of the processes around us — everything from bridges corroding in water to your breakfast breaking down in your gut. One crucial part of that reaction involves electrons striking water, and despite how commonplace this reaction is, scientists still have to use ballpark numbers for certain parts of the equation when they use computers to model them. An article published in Nature Communications on Jan. 16 offers a new and…

Highly stretchable aqueous batteries — ScienceDaily

The current development of stretchable battery materials that mimic the functions of nature has emerged as a highly interesting research area, necessary for the next wave of wearable electronics. A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented a bioinspired Jabuticaba-like hybrid carbon/polymer (HCP) composite that was developed into a stretchable current collector using a simple and cost-effective solution process. Using the HCP composite as a stretchable current collector, the research team has, for the first time, developed a highly stretchable…

Researchers develop highly stretchable aqueous batteries

Schematic showing the sequences in the overall fabrication process. Credit: UNIST The current development of stretchable battery materials that mimic the functions of nature has emerged for the next wave of wearable electronics. A recent study presented a bioinspired Jabuticaba-like hybrid carbon/polymer (HCP) composite that was developed into a stretchable current collector using a simple, cost-effective solution process. Using the HCP composite as a stretchable current collector, the research team has, for the first time, developed a highly stretchable rechargeable…

Hyperspectral imaging technology enables new artificial intelligence applications

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a highly cost-efficient hyperspectral imaging technology, which enables the introduction of new artificial intelligence applications into consumer devices. Spectral filtering technology takes advantage of the very-near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths, which even low-cost mobile phone cameras can detect. Artificial intelligence can be used to interpret this environmental spectral data within images, which is not visible to the naked eye. The developed hyperspectral camera uses VNIR wavelengths, which exceed the red colour seen by the…