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Engineering News

How soil bacteria can protect against corrosion in steel

The cell surface of a common soil bacteria (Streptomyces sp.) is not only hydrophobic but it protects the organism from desiccation and therefore the movement of water across the cell barrier. Swansea researchers extracted this biomaterial and dissolved it to create a protein solution that would self-assemble along hydrophobic / hydrophilic interfaces. Using this property, they were able to coat steel products and produce a robust protein coating that was less than 10 nanometers thick, able to withstand boiling and…

Plastic 12-bit RFID tag and read-out system with screen-printed antenna

Credit: IMEC Quad Industries, Agfa, imec and TNO announced today that they have demonstrated a plastic 12-bit RFID tag and read-out system with screen-printed circuitry. The system integrates, for the first time, a screen-printed antenna and printed touch-based user interface, allowing implementation of the reader on curved surfaces. The demonstrator has been designed for badge security applications, but holds promises for many other applications, including smart packages, wearables and interactive games. RFID tags made of plastics electronics offer specific advantages…

Increased drone use creating safety concerns in Canadian airspace

Geography doctoral student Paul Nesbit has led a study on how the proliferation of drones in Canadian airspace is causing new safety concerns. Credit: Paul Nesbit   Canadian airspace is adapting to the rise of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs) or, drones, which now outnumber piloted aircraft in our skies, and a new study from the University of Calgary shows this has led to a growing number of incidents and safety concerns. The study — published online in the Journal of Unmanned Vehicle…

NASA selects three aeronautics teams to explore ‘ambitious’ ideas

Principal Investigator Natalia Alexandrov makes the pitch to a group of NASA aeronautics managers for her team’s study, ATTRACTOR, which will explore how to embed reliability into algorithms that are used over time to inform autonomous systems in aviation. Credit: NASA/Andrew Carlsen Three teams of NASA researchers who have dreamed up potential solutions for pieces of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) puzzle have received the nod to officially begin formal feasibility studies of their concepts. The trio of investigations are…

Introducing Aardvark and Repokid – Netflix TechBlog – Medium

AWS Least Privilege for Distributed, High-Velocity Development by Jason Chan, Patrick Kelley, and Travis McPeak Aardvark Repokid Today we are pleased to announce two new open-source cloud security tools from Netflix: Aardvark and Repokid. Used together, these tools are the next logical step in our goal to run a secure, large scale Amazon Web Services (AWS) deployment that accommodates rapid innovation and distributed, high-velocity development. When used together, Aardvark and Repokid help us get closer to the principle of least…

A Day in the Life of a Materials Engineer

Anyone interested in working within the aerospace industry should understand the complex processes that go into developing commercial and military aircraft. Concepts are developed by design and engineering teams to combine new innovations with the perfect execution of past projects. From conceptual sketches and plans, production managers and personnel spend their time actually creating vehicles that will protect nations and carry commercial passengers. After manufacturing, aerospace companies meticulously test and maintain these vehicles in order to avoid future problems and…

Researchers debut battery-less pacemaker

The internal components of a battery-less pacemaker introduced this week by Rice University and the Texas Heart Institute. The pacemaker can be inserted into the heart and powered by a battery pack outside the body, eliminating the need for wire leads and surgeries to occasionally replace the battery. Credit: Rice Integrated Systems and Circuits/Rice University A wireless, battery-less pacemaker that can be implanted directly into a patient’s heart is being introduced by researchers from Rice University and their colleagues at…

Why rocks flow slowly in Earth’s middle mantle — ScienceDaily

For decades, researchers have studied the interior of the Earth using seismic waves from earthquakes. Now a recent study, led by Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration Associate Professor Dan Shim, has re-created in the laboratory the conditions found deep in the Earth, and used this to discover an important property of the dominant mineral in Earth’s mantle, a region lying far below our feet. Shim and his research team combined X-ray techniques in the synchrotron radiation…

New study reveals that brain signals in specific regions change over a lifespan in ways that might be important for maintaining flexibility — ScienceDaily

The brain is a complex organ — a network of nerve cells, or neurons, producing thought, memory, action, and feeling. How does this complex system change from childhood to adulthood to late life in order to maintain optimal behavioral responses? These questions were put to the test by a group of University of Miami psychologists who studied hundreds of fMRI brain scans, from two separate datasets, to see how the variability of brain signals changes or remains the same during…

Dev Tools @Scale 2017 Recap | Engineering Blog | Facebook Code

Last month more than 200 software engineers gathered at Studio Spaces in London to attend the first ever Dev Tools @Scale. The event had eight exciting presentations focused on development tools that either work at large scale or enable large scale development. Speakers from Amazon, ARM, Facebook, GitHub, Google, Microsoft, and Spotify covered many aspects of the software development cycle, starting from code search through source control and code quality to build and testing. For a recap of the conference…