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Engineering News

Building Spotify’s New Web Player

The purpose of this post is to tell the story of the new Spotify web player. How and why it came to be. We will focus on what the steps were that led to a complete rewrite and how the lessons learned influenced the experience and the tech decisions of the new web player for desktop browsers. Using the Web to implement Spotify applications at Spotify Spotify has been using web technologies for a long time. Before tools like Electron…

Building and Scaling Data Lineage at Netflix to Improve Data Infrastructure Reliability, and…

By: Di Lin, Girish Lingappa, Jitender Aswani Imagine yourself in the role of a data-inspired decision maker staring at a metric on a dashboard about to make a critical business decision but pausing to ask a question — “Can I run a check myself to understand what data is behind this metric?” Now, imagine yourself in the role of a software engineer responsible for a micro-service which publishes data consumed by few critical customer facing services (e.g. billing). You are about to…

Stalagmite holds key to predicting droughts, floods for India — ScienceDaily

A team of Vanderbilt University earth scientists returned to an unusual cave in India to unlock secrets about climate change that could have far-reaching implications. By studying the last 50 years of growth of a stalagmite from Mawmluh Cave in the northeastern Indian state of Meghalaya, an area that experiences so much summer monsoon rainfall that it is credited as the rainiest place on Earth, they found an unexpected connection between winter (dry season) rainfall amounts in northeast India and…

Quantum Computers Are Analog Computers

Today’s topic may be a little afield of conventional engineering ethics, but it involves billions of dollars at risk and the future of an entire engineering-intensive industry, so that’s enough to make it an ethical concern already.  Most engineers have heard of Moore’s Law, the observation that eventually became the backbone of the semiconductor industry’s road map or marching orders:  the doubling of computing power every two years.  In recent years, Moore’s Law has run into difficulties because you simply…

a Microscope and Centrifuge for Under $1 » Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog

Appropriate Technology: a Microscope and Centrifuge for Under $1 Posted on March 24, 2019  Comments (0) Malaria is estimated to have killed more than half the people that have ever lived. And it continues to kill millions. One big challenge is diagnosing malaria is difficult (those infected have flu like symptoms). The video shows two great appropriate technology solutions to help diagnose malaria and save millions of lives. Manu Prakash from Stanford talks about 2 of his labs’ inventions the…

Research demonstrates value of Amazon Echo and Google Home during medical procedures — ScienceDaily

-Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. Smart speakers, such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home, offer a conversational voice interface that allows interventional radiology (IR) physicians to ask questions and retrieve information needed for their patient treatments without breaking sterile scrub. “During treatment, IRs rely…

How electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide — ScienceDaily

New research from Washington University in St. Louis explains the cellular processes that allow a sun-loving microbe to “eat” electricity — transferring electrons to fix carbon dioxide to fuel its growth. Led by Arpita Bose, assistant professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, and Michael Guzman, a PhD candidate in her laboratory, a Washington University team showed how a naturally occurring strain of Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust. The work is described…

Knockout of Ptpn21 alters deformability — ScienceDaily

Scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Georgia Tech have found that modulating blood-forming stem cells’ stiffness could possibly facilitate mobilization procedures used for stem cell-based transplants. Temporary squishiness could help drive blood-forming stem cells out of the bone marrow and into the blood, but the cells need to be stiff to stay put and replenish the blood and immune system, the researchers have found. The results from animal research were published on March…

Tall ice-cliffs may trigger big calving events — and fast sea-level rise — ScienceDaily

Glaciers that drain ice sheets such as Antarctica or Greenland often flow into the ocean, ending in near-vertical cliffs. As the glacier flows into the sea, chunks of the ice break off in calving events. Although much calving occurs when the ocean melts the front of the ice, and ice cliff above falls down, a new study presents another method of calving: slumping. And this process could break off much larger chunks of ice at a quicker rate. The ice-cliff…

Sensor can monitor wiring in a building or ship, and signal when repairs are needed — ScienceDaily

A new system devised by researchers at MIT can monitor the behavior of all electric devices within a building, ship, or factory, determining which ones are in use at any given time and whether any are showing signs of an imminent failure. When tested on a Coast Guard cutter, the system pinpointed a motor with burnt-out wiring that could have led to a serious onboard fire. The new sensor, whose readings can be monitored on an easy-to-use graphic display called…