Mizzou Engineers showcased at chancellor’s address


Several Mizzou Engineering students, including Lydia Meyer, presented posters after the chancellor’s remarks, helping to illustrate the importance of quality research done at Mizzou. Photo by Ryan Owens.

Giving poster presentations is a fact of life for students participating in research at the University of Missouri College of Engineering. But being selected to present as part of an event held by Chancellor Alexander Cartwright discussing the importance of research at Mizzou is a unique honor.

Several Mizzou Engineering students presented posters after the chancellor’s remarks, helping to illustrate the importance of quality research done at Mizzou.

Nurhidayatun Anuar (senior, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), Alexander Beattie (senior, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Yen On Chan (senior, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Jacob Gajewski (senior, Bioengineering), Lia Howe (senior, Bioengineering), Lydia Meyer (senior, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), Sai Shreya Nuguri (graduate student, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Chloe Rees (senior, Bioengineering) and Weston Verhulst (senior, Information Technology) had their posters displayed at the event, with several on hand to share their findings with curious attendees from across campus.

“For me, it was a really good experience to try and showcase some of the life-changing research we do here and show how it’s impacting our community in general,” Meyer said.

The Engineering students’ poster titles were:

  • Keeping premature infants’ oxygen saturations at a safe level using automatic control — Meyer
  • vSocial: Social virtual reality learning environment to train youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder — Verhulst, Nuguri, Jangati
  • High throughput plant phenotyping platform — Chan, Anuar, Gajewski, Rees
  • Computational modeling of articular cartilage — Howe
  • Small plant imaging platform — Beattie

Meyer worked on the project as part of Associate Professor Roger Fales’ team, which is attempting to automate management of oxygen levels for Neonatal Intensive Care Unit patients. She was thrilled to have the opportunity to help showcase difference-making research alongside a group of peers doing equally important work. After all, it’s why she chose engineering in the first place.

“It makes me excited and happy to be an engineer, to see that there are things you can do like this and make a difference in people’s lives, makes me glad I chose the path that I chose,” she explained.



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