EECS professor named to AIMBE College of Fellows


 

Marge Skubic, professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Mizzou, recently was elected to the AIMBE College of Fellows. She was inducted alongside 155 colleagues from across the country in Washington D.C. on April 9. Photo courtesy of AIMBE.

Marge Skubic’s extensive and groundbreaking work in the field of eldercare and rehabilitation technology has earned several honors over the years. The latest comes from the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Skubic, professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Mizzou, recently was elected to the AIMBE College of Fellows. She was inducted alongside 155 colleagues from across the country in Washington D.C. on April 9.

Her work utilizing sensor technology to allow senior citizens to age in place for longer, as well as utilizing the same technology to predict and prevent injuries landed her the prestigious honor. Fellows are selected following a nomination period and rigorous review process, which judges their contributions to advancing the field and developing new technologies and improving education. AIMBE says that election places fellows in the top 2 percent of medical and biological engineers.

Skubic was nominated by MU Engineering Dean Elizabeth Loboa, who previously was inducted to the College of Fellows.

“I’m thankful that she thought enough of my work to do the nomination,” Skubic said.

AIMBE’s mission “is to recognize excellence, advance the public understanding, and accelerate medical and biological innovation.” The organization strives to bring together leaders from academia, industry, government and scientific societies to grow and improve the field of both medical and biological engineering through advocacy.

Before leaving for Washington D.C., Skubic said she was looking forward to attending several of the events at the AIMBE Annual Meeting prior to her induction to learn more about the organization and how she could help further its mission.

“It’s more focused on policy than my other academic organizations. ,” Skubic explained. “I plan to participate in as many of the activities as I can. It is always invigorating to talk with researchers at other institutions to see what others are investigating.”



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