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Category: Geotechnical Engineering

When study abroad means going home

Cailyn McCarthy will leave for Germany in September and complete her unique study abroad program in February. Photo courtesy of Cailyn McCarthy. For senior Civil and Environmental Engineering student Cailyn McCarthy, spending her final semester studying at the University of Tübingen will be more than a trip abroad. It will be a trip down memory lane. “My family moved to Germany when I was a baby, a little less than two years old,” she said. “We stayed about seven years…

Civil engineers devise a cost-saving solution for cities

Credit: Concordia University Why fix a road today if it’s slated to be ripped up for new sewers next summer? This kind of question is at the heart of research from Tarek Zayed, and Amin Hammad, professors in Concordia’s Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering (BCEE), and PhD candidates Soliman A. Abu-Samra and Mahmoud Ahmed. “Better coordination at city hall is the key to less costly repairs,” says Abu-Samra. “We’ve shown that streamlining maintenance results in huge financial…

New recyclable resin makes wind turbines much more sustainable

The new composite, Elium, cures without added heat and can be recycled when the turbine needs to be replaced. Credit: National Renewable Energy Laboratory and IACMI-The Composites Institute Fields of spinning wind turbines inspire thoughts of earth-friendly energy, but until now, generating wind power hasn’t been as sustainable as people may have thought. It generally requires a great deal of time and energy to cure the type of resin that makes the 150-foot-wide fiberglass turbines strong and durable. When they…

Mizzou Engineering duo presents at national ASEE conference

Alaaeldin Elsisi and Hesham El-Emam participated in the GEM-ASEE Doctoral Engineering Research Showcase. Photo courtesy of Alaaeldin Elsisi. Alaaeldin Elsisi and Hesham El-Emam participated in the GEM-ASEE Doctoral Engineering Research Showcase, hosted by the American Society for Engineering Education, on Jan. 22 and 23 in Washington, D.C. The Showcase is a unique event which invites “doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and new faculty to display their leading-edge technical research and connect with potential agency sponsors and academic employers. They will present their research…

Researchers develop low energy, cost-effective wastewater purification system

Researchers from NUS Faculty of Engineering have come up with a novel wastewater purification system that can remove up to 99 per cent of hard-to-treat organic compounds found in industrial wastewater. Credit: National University of Singapore A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has come up with a novel approach to treat industrial wastewater using electricity as a reagent for purification. The method can remove up to 99 per cent of hard-to-treat organic compounds found in…

Nevada quake lab tests new bridge design after Mexico quake

Researchers and invited dignitaries watch gathered at the University of Nevada, Reno’s new Earthquake Engineering Laboratory in Reno, Nev., on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, before a series of tests on new bridge designs intended to better withstand violent temblors. Scientists say the 100-ton, 70-foot-long concrete bridge subjected to violent motions on a giant ”shake table” held up better than expected using new innovations to connect prefabricated pieces with ultra-high performance concrete and could prove pivotal in earthquake-prone places like Mexico…

Testing bridges for safety after major hurricanes like Irma

Credit: Florida International University After Hurricane Irma hit, there was a major concern about South Florida’s bridges, mainly the ones in the Florida Keys. Would the structures be safe to cross for drivers anxious to get back home? Would relief efforts be impaired due to damage caused by massive winds? Fortunately, all 42 bridges that connect the mainland to the Keys were inspected and declared safe by Monroe County officials. If another major hurricane like Irma hits South Florida, an…

MU mother-daughter duo receives NSF I-Corps support

The Trauths —mother/ Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Kate and daughter/recent MU Civil and Environmental Engineering Department alumna Ginny — recently received a National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps grant to support development of an improved method of storm-water redistribution. Photo by Amy Parris. For land developers looking for a more efficient, cost-effective method of managing storm water, a mother-daughter duo from the University of Missouri College of Engineering soon will have just what they’re looking for. The Trauths…

In-car air study of commuting cars finds dangers to human health — ScienceDaily

The first in-car measurements of exposure to pollutants that cause oxidative stress during rush hour commutes has turned up potentially alarming results. The levels of some forms of harmful particulate matter inside car cabins was found to be twice as high as previously believed. Most traffic pollution sensors are placed on the ground alongside the road and take continuous samples for a 24-hour period. Exhaust composition, however, changes rapidly enough for drivers to experience different conditions inside their vehicles than…

New suit can enhance athletes’ performance with data

MARS employs real-time motion capture and visualization, using vibration sensors to measure the micro-movements in each of the wearer’s muscles. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering When it comes to professional athletics, every little bit counts, and for centuries, athletes have been doing everything they can to get ahead. From legal means like hiring the best trainers and purchasing the best equipment, to less legal means like pharmaceutical enhancement, athletic advantages come in all forms. But…