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Category: Geotechnical Engineering

Nevada quake lab tests new bridge design after Mexico quake

Researchers and invited dignitaries watch gathered at the University of Nevada, Reno’s new Earthquake Engineering Laboratory in Reno, Nev., on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, before a series of tests on new bridge designs intended to better withstand violent temblors. Scientists say the 100-ton, 70-foot-long concrete bridge subjected to violent motions on a giant ”shake table” held up better than expected using new innovations to connect prefabricated pieces with ultra-high performance concrete and could prove pivotal in earthquake-prone places like Mexico…

Testing bridges for safety after major hurricanes like Irma

Credit: Florida International University After Hurricane Irma hit, there was a major concern about South Florida’s bridges, mainly the ones in the Florida Keys. Would the structures be safe to cross for drivers anxious to get back home? Would relief efforts be impaired due to damage caused by massive winds? Fortunately, all 42 bridges that connect the mainland to the Keys were inspected and declared safe by Monroe County officials. If another major hurricane like Irma hits South Florida, an…

MU mother-daughter duo receives NSF I-Corps support

The Trauths —mother/ Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Kate and daughter/recent MU Civil and Environmental Engineering Department alumna Ginny — recently received a National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps grant to support development of an improved method of storm-water redistribution. Photo by Amy Parris. For land developers looking for a more efficient, cost-effective method of managing storm water, a mother-daughter duo from the University of Missouri College of Engineering soon will have just what they’re looking for. The Trauths…

In-car air study of commuting cars finds dangers to human health — ScienceDaily

The first in-car measurements of exposure to pollutants that cause oxidative stress during rush hour commutes has turned up potentially alarming results. The levels of some forms of harmful particulate matter inside car cabins was found to be twice as high as previously believed. Most traffic pollution sensors are placed on the ground alongside the road and take continuous samples for a 24-hour period. Exhaust composition, however, changes rapidly enough for drivers to experience different conditions inside their vehicles than…

New suit can enhance athletes’ performance with data

MARS employs real-time motion capture and visualization, using vibration sensors to measure the micro-movements in each of the wearer’s muscles. Credit: Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering When it comes to professional athletics, every little bit counts, and for centuries, athletes have been doing everything they can to get ahead. From legal means like hiring the best trainers and purchasing the best equipment, to less legal means like pharmaceutical enhancement, athletic advantages come in all forms. But…

UCI-led analysis of data from India could have dire implications for future — ScienceDaily

An increase in mean temperature of 0.5 degrees Celsius over half a century may not seem all that serious, but it’s enough to have more than doubled the probability of a heat wave killing in excess of 100 people in India, according to researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions. This could have grim implications for the future, because mean temperatures are projected to rise by 2.2 to 5.5 degrees Celsius by the end of this century…