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Category: Environmental Engineering

Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas — ScienceDaily

North Carolina State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into methane. After treating sewage, wastewater treatment plants are left with solid sludge, called biosolids. For years, utilities have treated biosolids with microbes that produce methane. In recent years, utilities have been adding grease interceptor waste (GIW) into the mix. Grease interceptors are used to trap fat, oil and grease from food service establishments so that they don’t…

MU hosts roundtable on distracted driving

Civil and Environmental Engineering PhD candidate Sandy Zhang asks a question of NTSB Vice Chairman Bruce Landsberg at the Missouri Roundtable on Distracted Driving in Memorial Union Oct. 29. You encounter them almost every time you get in your vehicle to travel someplace—drivers with one hand on the wheel and one hand on their cell phone. If you are lucky, those distracted drivers won’t involve you in an accident. Last year in Missouri, more than 21,000 motor vehicle crashes involved…

Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand — ScienceDaily

Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis from the University of Sussex and Aarhus University has revealed. In an analysis of all suitable sites for onshore wind farms, the new study reveals that Europe has the potential to supply enough energy for the whole world until 2050. The study reveals that if all of Europe’s capacity for onshore wind farms was realised, the installed nameplate…

Water treatment cuts parasitic roundworm infections affecting 800 million people — ScienceDaily

Roundworm infections can be reduced significantly simply by improving the treatment and quality of drinking water in high risk regions, according to an international team of researchers led by Tufts University. The discovery emerged from a two-year study, published in PloS Medicine, which examined the effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing and nutritional interventions on rates of intestinal worm and Giardia infections in rural Kenya. Water treatment alone was sufficient to cause an 18 percent reduction in infection rates in…

Flood prediction model developed — ScienceDaily

The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding. Conceptualized by Najibi and tested on the Missouri River Basin, the statistical model is based on data in the area from…

Do sensors make infrastructure safer?

Matteo Pozzi in front of Scott Hall at Carnegie Mellon University. Credit: College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University Simply driving down the road gives you a sense for the current state of our infrastructure: crumbling and in need of repair. Aside from retrofitting or replacing current infrastructure with new construction and materials, new technology like sensors offers a way for inspectors to peer inside the systems almost continuously. But just placing a sensor on the side of a bridge doesn’t…

Scaling up innovative sensor installation on the Mighty Mac

MSU has developed sensors that can detect road wear, bridge defects and more. Some sensors have already been deployed to Michigan’s iconic Mackinac Bridge. Credit: MSU The first 20 prototype infrastructure sensors installed in 2016 on the Mackinac Bridge, powered solely by vibrations from traffic, have proven their durability and performed as intended. Now researchers from Michigan State University and Washington University in St. Louis are ready to roll out the next phase of testing, installing up to 2,000 of…

Duo presents at Emerging Researchers National Conference

Amber Peterein presented her research on water treatment systems at the Emerging Researchers National Conference (ERN) in STEM last week. Photo courtesy of Amber Peterein. The Emerging Researchers National Conference (ERN) in STEM selects top student researchers to present groundbreaking projects, with the goal of advancing their abilities to effectively communicate in the science community and ultimately their future careers. Two Mizzou Engineers were among the high-caliber students selected. Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Amber Peterein and Laura Wiseman each earned…

Research will help urban planners prioritize bike lanes

Credit: CC0 Public Domain A new virtual tool could help planners choose the best places to install bikes lanes in cities. The data-based tool builds on previous research at the University of Waterloo that validated the safety benefits of bike lanes for cyclists and motorists. Collected using sensors and a handlebar camera as researchers cycled hundreds of kilometres in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, the data showed bike lanes virtually eliminate vehicles getting too close to cyclists when they pass them. …

Cutting-edge underwater mining system can give flooded mines a new lease of life

Credit: Andriy Solovyov, Shutterstock Europe has an estimated EUR 100 billion worth of unexploited mineral resources lying at depths of 500-1,000 m. Following centuries of active mining, the continent’s more accessible mineral deposits are mostly depleted. However, there are still deep-lying resources in abandoned flooded mines and in unmined underwater deposits that can’t be exploited using conventional dry mining techniques. Thanks to a novel underwater mining system developed by the EU-funded project VAMOS, currently unreachable mineral deposits will be extracted…