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Category: Environmental Engineering

Aquatic animals’ maximum jumping height is related to their body size, while ‘entrained water mass’ plays a limiting role — ScienceDaily

Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? A group of researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question and are exploring the specific physical conditions required for animals to successfully leap out of water. During the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, which will take place Nov. 18-20 at the Georgia World Congress…

Students awarded more than $1.29 million at Scholarship Dinner

Dean Elizabeth Loboa and Civil Engineering alumnus Jim Kissick were the speakers at Thursday’s Scholarship Dinner. Photo by Shelby O’Keefe. More than $1.29 million in scholarships were awarded to 537 Mizzou Engineering students at Thursday’s annual Scholarship Dinner. At the event, recipients had the chance to meet and commiserate with the individuals, families, friends and faculty of the College who funded their scholarships. Jim Kissick was one of the hundreds of supporters of Mizzou Engineering and its students, and he…

Alumnus helps solidify strength of construction management minor

Sherman Honeycutt, seen here with Carlos Sun, earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Mizzou in 1974. Sherman Honeycutt has made a career out of construction management. And now he’s paying his love of the industry forward as MU Civil and Environmental Engineering reintroduces its construction management minor. Honeycutt earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Mizzou in 1974. He went on to become president at Design & Construction Management Services, Inc. in the, San Francisco Bay Area.…

A clever way to recover weather balloon radiosondes

Julie Reznicek, Hugo Cruz, Lorenzo Donadio,Simon Léo Albers and Guillem Rivas Castellá. Credit: Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne The meteorological sensors carried into the upper atmosphere by weather balloons are often lost as they return to earth. As part of their Bachelor’s project, five EPFL students worked on a system to recover this equipment. Dozens of balloon-borne radiosondes are released into the atmosphere every day. They measure temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity and wind direction at different altitudes before eventually falling…

Artificial intelligence technology could help protect water supplies

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health. Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed AI software capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates. “We need to protect our water supplies,” said Monica Emelko, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and member of…

Solving mystery behind building collapses is latest quest for MU’s Orton

When structures collapse because of an earthquake or another natural disaster, the explanation is easy. When they collapse seemingly out of nowhere, that’s a different story — one that Sarah Orton intends to solve. The goal of Sarah Orton’s latest project is to study structures under high amounts of sustained load and discover why, in the absence of any change in loading or natural disasters, they collapse. Orton, MU associate professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Ying Tian of…

Could studying swarm behaviors teach us how to help drones fly safely?

A starling roost in the United Kingdom. Credit: Unsplash/James Wainscoat Anyone who’s seen a flock of starlings twist and turn across the sky may have wondered: How do they maneuver in such close formation without colliding? “Many types of animals swarm or flock or otherwise move in coordinated ways,” says Nicholas Ouellette, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford. “No individual animal knows what every other animal is doing, yet somehow they move cohesively as a group.”…

Awards and presentations showcase Mizzou at CELDi symposium

Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering undergraduate Molly Laird earned the CELDi Outstanding Undergraduate Student Achievement Award for her outstanding research done on behalf of the organization. Laird is advised by IMSE Professor and CELDi Director Jim Noble (right) and IMSE Assistant Professor Ron McGarvey (second from right). Photo courtesy of Jim Noble. The Center for Excellence in Logistics and Distribution (CELDi) held its Spring Industrial Research Symposium recently, and a Mizzou undergraduate took home a prestigious award. Industrial and Manufacturing…

MU Engineering junior bitten by study abroad bug

Civil and Environmental Engineering junior John Perlik has added yet another stamp to his growing passport by studying abroad in South Korea for the entirety of his junior year. Photo courtesy of John Perlik. After spending his freshman year winter break on a College of Engineering study abroad trip, John Perlik caught the travel bug. Big time. In fact, the Civil and Environmental Engineering major has travelled to more than 35 countries since and racked up an impressive number of…

When study abroad means going home

Cailyn McCarthy will leave for Germany in September and complete her unique study abroad program in February. Photo courtesy of Cailyn McCarthy. For senior Civil and Environmental Engineering student Cailyn McCarthy, spending her final semester studying at the University of Tübingen will be more than a trip abroad. It will be a trip down memory lane. “My family moved to Germany when I was a baby, a little less than two years old,” she said. “We stayed about seven years…