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Category: Electronics Engineering

Rescuing Our Science Fair from COVID-19

We have been at it for 65 years, but this year’s Bristol-Meyers Squibb Mercer Science and Engineering Fair was a lot different because of COVID-19. Rider University normally hosts our fair at their facilities. However, it was closed down the week of the fair like all educational facilities in New Jersey. It would not have been too bad except the Mercer Science and Engineering Club, of which I am president, was notified days before it was to start. That set…

Automotive Industry Producing Life-Saving Technology on the Fly

Ford Motor Company took a prudent step to boost containment efforts for the coronavirus by temporarily suspending production at its manufacturing sites in North America. The automotive company reported that Ford is not planning to restart its plants in the U.S., Canada and Mexico on Mon., March 30 as originally hoped. “We are assessing various options and working with union leaders—including the United Auto Workers and Unifor—on the optimal timing for resuming vehicle production, keeping the well-being of our workforce…

Advanced schema management for Spark applications at scale

Schema management workflow With the scale of LinkedIn’s data processing ecosystem, it is mandatory to provide a solution that imposes minimal overhead on the data processing application development lifecycle. In addition to addressing the challenges stated in the previous section, we had to ensure that our solution relied on standard software development practices to include and build schemas. For that purpose, we built infrastructure to serve dataset schemas as software artifacts. This entails capturing Avro schemas of datasets from the…

Bonding Method Attaches Gallium Nitride to Thermally Conductive Materials

Engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have come up with an easier way to attach wide bandgap materials such as gallium nitride (GaN) to thermally conducting materials such as diamond. This would boost the cooling effect on GaN devices and lead to better performance through higher power levels, longer device lifetimes, improved reliability and lower manufacturing costs. The technique could have applications for wireless transmitters, radars, satellite equipment, and other high-power and high-frequency electronic devices. The technique, called surface-activated…

High-efficiency laser for silicon chips — ScienceDaily

Transistors in computer chips work electrically, but data can be transmitted more quickly by using light. For this reason, researchers have long been looking for a way to integrate lasers directly in silicon chips. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have now come a step closer to achieving this. Together with researchers from Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies (C2N) in Paris and the French company STMicroelectronics as well as CEA-LETI Grenoble, they have developed a compatible semiconductor laser made of germanium…

GAP9: 9 Cores Are Better than 8

The AdaCore Make with Ada competition has a winner. The competition is one I helped to judge—I’m very interested in spreading the word about SPARK and Ada. I’ve been doing this for a number of years and have seen some amazing improvement in the quality of the projects and in the use of SPARK. SPARK is a provable subset of Ada that takes advantage of Ada 2012’s contract support. A number of projects employed this feature, including the winner.  “I…

Why Do Some Solar Panels Fail Prematurely?

Unlike diamonds, solar panels are not forever. Ultraviolet rays, gusts of wind and heavy rain wear away at them over their lifetime. Manufacturers typically guarantee panels will withstand the elements for at least 25 years before experiencing significant drop-offs in power generation. Recent reports, however, call out a trend of panels failing decades before expected. For some models, there has been a spike in the number of cracked backsheets, the layers of plastic that electrically insulate and physically shield the…

Tunable Microwave Reflector Could Be the Next-Generation Antenna

Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are reinventing the mirror, at least for microwaves. Their invention could replace the familiar satellite dishes and microwave horns seen on rooftops and cell towers with flat panels that are compact, versatile and better adapted for modern communications. “Our new reflectors offer lightweight, low-profile alternatives to conventional antennas. This is a potential boon for satellites, where minimizing weight and size is crucial,” says Abul Azad, of the MPA-CINT group at Los Alamos National Laboratory.…

The Bandwidth Alliance Charges Forward with New Partners

We started the Bandwidth Alliance in 2018 with a group of like-minded cloud and networking partners. Our common goal was to help our mutual customers reduce or eliminate data transfer charges, sometimes known as “bandwidth” or “egress” fees, between the cloud and the consumer. By reducing or eliminating these costs, our customers can more easily choose a best of breed set of solutions because they don’t have to worry about data charges from moving workloads between vendors, and thereby becoming…

Patients take Mind-Controlled Prosthetics for a Test Drive

In what represents a major advance in mind-controlled prosthetics for amputees, biomedical researchers at the University of Michigan have tapped faint, latent signals from arm nerves and amplified them to carry out real-time, intuitive control of the fingers on a robotic hand. To do this, the researchers had to develop a way to safely harness nerve endings, separate thick nerve bundles into smaller fibers that provide more precise control and amplify the signals coming through those nerves. The approach involves…