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Category: Electrical Engineering

Alumni, faculty, students, staff honored at Engineering Awards Banquet

The annual Engineering Awards Banquet took place on March 16, honoring outstanding students, faculty, staff and the winners of the Missouri Honor Awards, James E. “Bud” Moulder Award and Citation of Merit, the three most prestigious honors the College bestows upon alumni and supporters. Steve Borgelt accepts his Missouri Honor Award from Dean Elizabeth Loboa. Photos by Trevor Liptak. Steve Borgelt and Dick Warder were the recipients of the Missouri Honor Award, which recognizes and honors the outstanding contributions of…

NIH grant supports tailoring eldercare health alert system for consumer use

Members of the Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Missouri have done breakthrough work in utilizing sensor technology to alert health professionals to potential health issues for senior citizens living in their own homes or in assisted living facilities. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor and Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology Director Marge Skubic and a team that includes fellow EECS Professor Jim Keller and leading researchers from the MU Schools of Social Work, Nursing…

A flexible, low-cost technique could lead to the mass production of microelectromechanical systems

Tapered contact opening fabricated by new two-step plasma etching process. Credit: IEEE Making increasingly smaller microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has proved very challenging, limiting their anticipated potential. Now, researchers at A*STAR have developed a versatile and cost-effective technique for making devices with much greater precision and reliability for use in biotechnology and medical applications. MEMS are used in applications ranging from airbag systems and display screens, to inkjet cartridges. They are tiny devices that combine mechanical and electrical components. Current manufacturing…

Prelas lands among elite company as American Physical Society fellow

The list of fellows of the American Physical Society reads like a who’s who of the physics world from the 20th Century to the present day. You can add a member of the Mizzou Engineering faculty to that prestigious list. Mark Prelas, professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, was elected in the most recent group of fellows of the APS. He was nominated by the Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications and was selected for outstanding and sustained…

Printing the ‘soft’ robots of the future

Three-dimensional printing offers unique advantages, but still faces many challenges, for fabricating small, flexible robots that can navigate through the human body and other confined spaces, according to a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. Researchers at South Korea’s Jeju National University examined the latest research and developments in fabricating soft robots using 3-D printing technologies. Their study concludes that 3-D printing is well suited to build robots that have complex external shapes together with an…

Observing fluctuations on the single-molecule scale — ScienceDaily

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a technique for analyzing structural and electronic fluctuations on the single-molecule scale across the metal-molecule interface in an organic electronic device. This technique provides information that cannot be obtained using the conventional method, and it has important implications for devices such as organic solar cells. The organic electronics field is gaining prominence in both academia and industry as devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and solar cells have multiple advantages…

European clocks slowed by lag in continent’s power grid

In this Nov. 1, 2017 file photo high power cables hang from a pole on a field in Hattersheim, Germany. ​​Millions of Europeans who arrived late to work or school Wednesday March 7, 2018 have a good excuse: an unprecedented slowing of the frequency of the continent’s electricity grid. The Brussels-based European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity, or ENTSO-E, says the problem began mid-January and affects 25 countries, from Portugal to Poland and Greece and Germany. (AP Photo/Michael…

Can sound be used as a weapon?

Electrical engineering and computer science professors Wenyuan Xu from Zhejiang University and Kevin Fu from the University of Michigan explain their research, which suggests a more likely scenario of sloppy engineering, and what ultrasound frequencies (which can be used to transmit information gathered by listening devices) traveling through the air can – and can’t – do. 1. What is ultrasound useful for? The most commonly known use for ultrasound – high-frequency sound waves human ears can’t hear –…

MU Engineering alums get look at Career Fair from behind the table

Argus Consulting, a fueling systems design company located in Overland Park, Kan., has had plenty of luck with Mizzou Engineering alums of late. Argus sent a trio of recent alumni in search of more Mizzou Engineers, including Claire Stockman (BS CIE ’16). Photos by Brandan Haskell. A total of 756 students worked their way through Mizzou Arena on Feb. 7 in search of a cutting-edge job or internship. And 117 companies were there to greet them at the Spring 2018…

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics

University of Washington graduate student, Jinyuan Zhang, demonstrates how wearable sensors can track eye movement. Credit: Dennis R. Wise/University of Washington University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper – similar to toilet tissue – into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. The technology, described in a paper published in…