.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Electrical Engineering

3-D printing sweeps toy manufacturing off the shelves

Each plastic building block is made of a different plastic and process; 3-D printing has the potential to disrupt conventional toy production, making it cheaper to make toys at home. Credit: Joshua Pearce Cheap, plastic toys—no manufacturer necessary. The 2020 toy and game market is projected to be $135 billion, and 3-D printing brings those profits home. People have scoffed that 3-D printers are simply toys themselves. But they probably didn’t realize how much money is made off playthings. Do-it-yourself…

MRI device could bridge neuro-technologies for medical diagnostics, increase safety

Researchers from Purdue’s College of Engineering are developing a device that when placed into existing MRI machines could allow medical professionals to perform concurrent medical imaging and recording simultaneously. The technology would allow a more effective and safe way to monitor patients for diagnostic purposes. Credit: Shannon Kane / Purdue Research Foundation Image A technology being developed at Purdue University could provide an affordable, smart, self-learning device that, when placed into existing MRI machines could allow medical professionals to monitor…

Large Scale Redox Flow Battery (700 megawatt hours) » Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog

Large Scale Redox Flow Battery (700 megawatt hours) Posted on July 16, 2017  Comments (0) Scientists and engineers in Germany have created the largest battery in the world with redox flow technology. Redox flow batteries are liquid batteries. The Friedrich Schiller University of Jena has developed a new and forward-looking salt-free (brine) based metal-free redox flow battery. This new development will use salt caverns as energy storage. Schematic for salt-free (brine) based metal-free redox flow battery by Ewe Gasspeicher. Two…

Remotely controlling electronic devices with hand gestures

The watchstrap contains piezoresistive fibers produced on a 3D printer. The wrist movements are transmitted to steer the drone. Credit: Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology Moving things with a wave of the hand: thanks to Empa technology this dream could soon become real. A sensor made of piezo-resistive fibers integrated in a wristband measures wrist movements and converts them into electrical signals. This can be used to steer drones or other electronic devices without a remote control.…

Wiring a Thermometer to Your Van to Turn on AC as Needed as You Sleep » Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog

Wiring a Thermometer to Your Van to Turn on AC as Needed as You Sleep Posted on July 8, 2017  Comments (0) You may well not be familiar with the growing vanlife community, but I learned of it and see it as an intriguing lifestyle possibility. It allows you to travel and stay in National Forest and BLM land for free (in the USA) and relatively cheaply at campgrounds etc.. People also live in them in cities while traveling stay…

How to make ‘your own supernova’ — ScienceDaily

One of the most extreme astrophysical events, Supernova explosions are the violent deaths of certain stars that scatter elements heavier than hydrogen and helium into surrounding space. Our own solar system is thought to have formed when a nearby supernova exploded distributing these elements into a cloud of hydrogen that then condensed to form our sun and the planets. In fact, the very atoms that make up our bodies were formed in the remnants of such an explosion. Working in…

First battery-free cellphone makes calls by harvesting ambient power

UW engineers have designed the first battery-free cellphone that can send and receive calls using only a few microwatts of power. Credit: Mark Stone/University of Washington University of Washington researchers have invented a cellphone that requires no batteries—a major leap forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones. Instead, the phone harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light. The team also made Skype calls using its battery-free phone, demonstrating that the…

Team develops sprayable sensing network technology for structural health monitoring

The nanocomposite sensors developed Professor Su Zhongqing from PolyU Department of Mechanical Engineering can be sprayed directly on flat or curved engineering structures. Credit: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) research team developed a novel breed of nanocomposites-inspired sensors which can be sprayed directly on flat or curved engineering structural surfaces, such as train tracks and aeroplane structures. The sprayed sensors can be networked, to render rich real-time information on the health status of the…

World’s smallest and most accurate 3-D-printed biopsy robot

S4 side wide annotated . Credit: University of Twente The world’s smallest and most accurate 3-D-printed biopsy robot was revealed last week. The Stormram 4, as the robot is named, is made from 3-D-printed plastic and is driven by air pressure. The advantage of plastic is that the robot can be used in an MRI scanner. Carrying out a biopsy (removing a piece of tissue) during a breast cancer scan in an MRI significantly increases accuracy. The robot won a…

Ahead of July 1 deadline, team makes its most precise measurement yet of Planck’s constant — ScienceDaily

Using a state-of-the-art device for measuring mass, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made their most precise determination yet of Planck’s constant, an important value in science that will help to redefine the kilogram, the official unit of mass in the SI, or international system of units. Accepted for publication (link is external) in the journal Metrologia, these new results come ahead of a July 1 international deadline for measurements that aim to redefine the…