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Category: Electrical Engineering

Unusual particle interactions open up new possibilities in exotic materials — ScienceDaily

When you plug in an appliance or flip on a light switch, electricity seems to flow instantly through wires in the wall. But in fact, the electricity is carried by tiny particles called electrons that slowly drift through the wires. On their journey, electrons occasionally bump into the material’s atoms, giving up some energy with every collision. The degree to which electrons travel unhindered determines how well a material can conduct electricity. Environmental changes can enhance conductivity, in some cases…

More accurate biopsy by augmented reality

Credit: University of Twente The University of Twente is currently developing a smartphone technology based on the usage of Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) and augmented reality (AR). This technology enables medical personnel to reconstruct 3-D body sections quickly, only by holding the smartphone around the area of interest. This smartphone will display the augmented layers of the 3-D skin surface in order to visualize invisible information for medical personnel. “We would like to layer the information from the MRI…

Footsteps to preventing falls

One of four elderly persons falls every year in the United States. With more than 37 million hospitalizations every year, roughly one million falls occur in hospitals and can lead to serious injury and even death. Patients often fall while trying to get out of bed or when they walk for longer than they are able. Nurses can’t constantly monitor individual patients because of the number of patients they attend to. Sensors can continuously monitor patients, but many only detect…

Software technology that simulates LED devices for rapid development of light sources

A Purdue-affiliated company is developing a new time and cost effective software technology that could offer a more efficient and realistic way to model and simulate light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to achieve more powerful and more efficient LED light sources often used in general lighting, automobile lighting and consumer electronics. Tillmann Kubis, a research assistant professor, and Gerhard Klimeck, a professor, both in Purdue’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in Purdue’s Network for Computational Nanotechnology and Purdue’s…

In Ivory Coast, ‘drone academy’ offers youth the chance to soar

The Ivorian Electricity Company (CIE) is using drones to revolutionise the inspection of its infrastructure “Drones have become my passion,” says Noursely Doumbia, who holds a degree in electronics and is currently learning to pilot drones as part of a pioneering programme in Ivory Coast’s economic capital Abidjan. The training is being offered at a new “drone academy” which has been set up by the Ivorian Electricity Company (CIE) in order to revolutionise the inspection of its infrastructure and ultimately…

Reusing electric pylons to design the roof of a train station

Six high-voltage lines are due to be taken down in Valais canton. Credit: Swissgrid For his Master’s project, Joseph Desruelle devised a plan to reuse steel bars from dismantled electricity pylons to make a new roof for the Lausanne train station. This approach is still theoretical, but reusing materials in this way could one day become commonplace. For his Master’s project in civil engineering, Joseph Desruelle came up with a project to count and classify thousands of steel bars from…

Combining cutting-edge materials for more efficient, sensitive gaseous sensors

This sensor can detect methane at much lower concentrations than current ones. It relies on nanotechnology developed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, an Office of Science user facility. The human nose can distinguish among a trillion different combinations of smells. Even so, there are plenty of gases that our noses can’t detect at the level of sensitivity we need. That’s where gaseous sensors come in. While some of the first sensors were animals – like canaries in coal mines…

Alumni, faculty, students, staff honored at Engineering Awards Banquet

The annual Engineering Awards Banquet took place on March 16, honoring outstanding students, faculty, staff and the winners of the Missouri Honor Awards, James E. “Bud” Moulder Award and Citation of Merit, the three most prestigious honors the College bestows upon alumni and supporters. Steve Borgelt accepts his Missouri Honor Award from Dean Elizabeth Loboa. Photos by Trevor Liptak. Steve Borgelt and Dick Warder were the recipients of the Missouri Honor Award, which recognizes and honors the outstanding contributions of…

NIH grant supports tailoring eldercare health alert system for consumer use

Members of the Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology at the University of Missouri have done breakthrough work in utilizing sensor technology to alert health professionals to potential health issues for senior citizens living in their own homes or in assisted living facilities. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor and Center for Eldercare and Rehabilitation Technology Director Marge Skubic and a team that includes fellow EECS Professor Jim Keller and leading researchers from the MU Schools of Social Work, Nursing…

A flexible, low-cost technique could lead to the mass production of microelectromechanical systems

Tapered contact opening fabricated by new two-step plasma etching process. Credit: IEEE Making increasingly smaller microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has proved very challenging, limiting their anticipated potential. Now, researchers at A*STAR have developed a versatile and cost-effective technique for making devices with much greater precision and reliability for use in biotechnology and medical applications. MEMS are used in applications ranging from airbag systems and display screens, to inkjet cartridges. They are tiny devices that combine mechanical and electrical components. Current manufacturing…