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Category: Electrical Engineering

Technique locates robots, soldiers in GPS-challenged areas

U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists Dr. Fikadu Dagefu (left) and Gunjan Verma (right) pose with one of the robots used to validate a new algorithm they developed, which enables localization of humans and robots indoors or in areas with many obstacles where GPS signals are likely to be unavailable. Credit: Jhi Scott Scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a novel algorithm that enables localization of humans and robots in areas where GPS is unavailable. According to ARL…

Permanent, wireless self-charging system using NIR band

Figure 1. a) Conceptual NIR-driven self-charging system including a flexible CQD PVs module and an interdigitatedly structured LIB. b) Photographic images of a conventional wearable healthcare bracelet and a self-charging system-integrated wearable device. Credit: The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) As wearable devices are emerging, there are numerous studies on wireless charging systems. Here, a KAIST research team has developed a permanent, wireless self-charging platform for low-power wearable electronics by converting near-infrared (NIR) band irradiation to electrical…

Bioengineering grad student makes waves in MR research with a 3-D printed phantom head

From a 3T MRI dataset and a 3D digital segmented image to a 3D-printed prototype. Credit: RF Research Facility Phantoms are not just ghostly figures of our imagination, they are also numerical or physical models that represent human characteristics and provide an inexpensive way to test electromagnetic applications. Sossena Wood, a bioengineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh, has developed a realistic phantom head for magnetic resonance research in the Swanson School of Engineering. Wood started her tenure at…

PCB pollution threatens to wipe out killer whales — ScienceDaily

More than forty years after the first initiatives were taken to ban the use of PCBs, the chemical pollutants remain a deadly threat to animals at the top of the food chain. A new study, just published in the journal Science, shows that the current concentrations of PCBs can lead to the disappearance of half of the world’s populations of killer whales from the most heavily contaminated areas within a period of just 30-50 years. Killer whales (Orcinus orca) form…

LinkedIn Begins Contributing Open19 Platform to the Community

Last summer, LinkedIn helped announce the launch of the Open19 Foundation and our role as a founding member. Our aim was to assist in building a community for a new generation of open data centers and edge solutions and to one day contribute our Open19 project to the foundation. Over the last year, we’ve successfully advanced that mission both in our support of the foundation and in our advancement of the Open19 platform. Today, in conjunction with the Open19 Summit,…

Internship Success: Lund-Molfese ensures his future

John Lund-Molfese spent his summer interning with Shelter Insurance. Photo courtesy of John Lund-Molfese. MU Electrical Engineering and Computer Science senior John Lund-Molfese maximized his engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing an internship at Shelter Insurance in Columbia. Learn a little more about his internship in his own words. Lund-Molfese: Working at Shelter Insurance as a part-time software developer over the summer has been a great experience. Classes taught by Dale Musser, like Software Engineering, have been especially useful, because…

Cooking with wood or coal is linked to increased risk of respiratory illness and death — ScienceDaily

Burning wood or coal to cook food is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or dying from respiratory diseases, according to new research conducted in China and published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. About three billion people around the world live in households that regularly burn wood, coal or other solid fuels to cook their food. Solid fuels emit very high levels of pollutants, especially very small particles that can penetrate…

Researchers work to add function to 3-D-printed objects

Credit: CC0 Public Domain In the movie Terminator 2, the T-1000 robot pours itself through the ceiling of an elevator. That scene started a flow of ideas for Purdue Polytechnic Institute professor Richard Voyles. “The point is, he’s computing while pouring,” said Voyles, a professor in engineering technology. “It may be fiction, but there’s sensing, computation and actuation that are all happening simultaneously while in that liquid state.” Purdue Polytechnic Institute and the College of Engineering faculty are working…

Making a Career Move to Programming

Joe Zhou left his finance role at Uber to become the seventh iOS engineer on Uber Eats. Two and a half years into his engineering career, Joe reflects on his journey and offers advice for others considering taking the plunge into programming.   Prior to joining Uber, I had never considered becoming a professional engineer. I studied finance in college. I interned at an investment bank and then in corporate finance at a tech company. When I did start working…

Low cost navigation system for unmanned aerial systems

Credit: CC0 Public Domain An EU-funded initiative has developed a low-cost positioning and navigation system for unmanned aerial systems (UASs). Utilising multiple-antenna, the device is based on off-the-shelf components and advanced data fusion algorithms. UASs have attracted growing interest for use in agriculture, public safety, smart cities, sustainable resource management, and many other areas. There is now a significant demand for an affordable, reliable system that can provide estimations of attitude and position for these devices. The EU-funded Horizon…