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Category: Electrical Engineering

Organic cathode offers more reliable contact with electrolyte, a key to stability — ScienceDaily

Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages. Researchers Friday reported developing an organic cathode that dramatically improves both stability and energy density. The improved performance, reported in the journal Joule, is related to two key findings: The resistive interface between the electrolyte and cathode that commonly forms during cycling can be reversed, extending cycle life, and The…

Transparent architecture

The ETH spin-off Archilyse developed a software that allows the analysis of real estate down to the smallest detail. Credit: Archilyse ETH spin-off Archilyse promises nothing less than the “world’s most comprehensive architecture analysis” on its website. The young entrepreneurs are attracting a lot of interest in the real estate sector. Is a four-room apartment family-friendly or more suitable for a couple? How can office space be optimally divided so that its users feel comfortable? Archilyse helps to answer these…

Scientists developing technology for water purification by electric discharges

Credit: CC0 Public Domain The environment around us is becoming increasingly polluted. This includes one of our most precious natural resources—water. Clean water is essential to human survival. Due to increased pollution, water treatment methods are becoming increasingly important as well. As regards scientifically proven methods, the plasma water treatment by electrical discharge method is ousting the water chlorination method applied over the last 100 years. An international research group led by Professor at the TalTech Department of Material and…

The first-of-its-kind nanogenerator also acts as a weather station — ScienceDaily

UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow. The first of its kind, this device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic. “The device can work in remote areas because it provides its own power and does not need batteries,” said senior author Richard Kaner, who holds UCLA’s Dr. Myung Ki Hong Endowed Chair in Materials Innovation. “It’s a very clever device — a weather station that can tell…

PCB Assembly Services – Screaming Circuits: 150 Years of Predicting the Elements of Electronics, Part 2

A Few Words from Sara Shepherd, Screaming Circuits Contributing Blogger… We return to our series celebrating the periodic table’s 150th birthday. As we learned in our first post on the subject, there were several chemists working to arrange the elements, but it was Dmitri Mendeleev’s ability to predict undiscovered elements that set him apart. We explored one of these elements in our first post: gallium, the discovery of which caused Mendeleev’s table to become universal accepted. Another of Mendeleev’s predicted but…

The interface makes the difference — ScienceDaily

A collaboration led by ICIQ’s Palomares group deepens the understanding of the impact that changing the materials in a perovskite solar cell has on its performance. The results, published in the peer-reviewed journal Energy & Environmental Science, will help rationalize the design of the components of cells, thus increasing their commercial appeal. Perovskite-based solar cells are the fastest-advancing solar technology to date. Since they were first used in 2009, perovskite solar cells have achieved high efficiencies (over 22% under standard…

Robotics Design Challenge encourages young students to pursue STEM

About 400 fourth and fifth graders participated in this year’s Robotics Design Challenge, representing 26 schools from across Missouri. Photo by Danielle DuClos. About 400 fourth and fifth graders traveled from all around the state to compete Saturday in MU’s 14th annual Robotics Design Challenge, where students put their programming skills to the test to see if their robots could conquer the course. The event is aimed at introducing students to programming and coding at an early age so they…

Purdue startup wins Army’s xTechSearch for newest technology to meet modernization needs

A test fire at Purdue’s Zucrow Laboratories, the nation’s largest university propulsion laboratory, by Adranos Inc. of a high-performance, solid propellant for long-range missile and space launch systems. Adranos was selected as the winner of the Army’s inaugural xTechSearch competition. Credit: Purdue University Adranos Inc., a Purdue University-affiliated company developing a high-performance, solid propellant for long-range missile and space launch systems, has won the Army’s inaugural xTechSearch competition, besting more than 350 companies in the months long competition. The award…

Liquid nitrogen calamities – The Safety ZoneLiquid nitrogen calamities – The Safety Zone

Posted By Jyllian Kemsley on Mar 28, 2019 in Academia, Accidents, Featured | Credit: Shutterstock Via @sarahdcady on Twitter, some liquid nitrogen stories from 2006. One wasn’t quite a calamity–but it easily could have been. Down the stairs at the University of California, Berkeley: Yesterday the LeConte elevator was out of order, which for most of us would have meant taking the long way around. However, one undergrad, tasked with transporting a full 230 L dewar, simply…

Turing Award presented to LeCun, Hinton, and Bengio

Facebook’s Chief AI Scientist, Yann LeCun, is one of three recipients of this year’s Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing Award. Sharing the honor is Yoshua Bengio (MILA and University of Montreal) and Geoffrey Hinton (Google, Vector Institute, and University of Toronto). Often referred to as the Nobel Prize of computing, the award recognizes the group’s conceptual and engineering breakthroughs that made deep neural networks a critical component of computing. The pioneering work by these researchers has led to…