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Category: Electrical Engineering

MU Engineering alums get look at Career Fair from behind the table

Argus Consulting, a fueling systems design company located in Overland Park, Kan., has had plenty of luck with Mizzou Engineering alums of late. Argus sent a trio of recent alumni in search of more Mizzou Engineers, including Claire Stockman (BS CIE ’16). Photos by Brandan Haskell. A total of 756 students worked their way through Mizzou Arena on Feb. 7 in search of a cutting-edge job or internship. And 117 companies were there to greet them at the Spring 2018…

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics

University of Washington graduate student, Jinyuan Zhang, demonstrates how wearable sensors can track eye movement. Credit: Dennis R. Wise/University of Washington University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper – similar to toilet tissue – into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. The technology, described in a paper published in…

Researchers run first tests of unique system for welding highly irradiated metal alloys

ORNL and EPRI built an enclosed welding system in a hot cell of ORNL’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. C. Scott White (ORNL) performs operations with remotely controlled manipulators and cameras. The system combines capabilities for laser welding and frictional stir welding of irradiated stainless steels. Credit: DOE LWRS; photographer Keith Leonard Scientists of the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) and partners from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have conducted the first weld tests to repair…

Engineering professor identifies the progress and untapped potential of wearable sensors

UC engineering student Adam Hauke holds up the latest generation of wearable sensor in UC’s Novel Devices Lab. Credit: Joseph Fuqua II/UC Creative Services When it comes to biometric sensors, human skin isn’t an ally. It’s an obstacle. The University of Cincinnati is developing cutting-edge methods to overcome this barrier without compromising the skin and its ability to prevent infection and dehydration. By making better noninvasive tests, researchers can open up enormous opportunities in medicine and the fitness industry.…

A ski jacket that actively gets rid of sweat

During winter sports, the body produces a lot of moisture. Nevertheless, new functional clothing ensures a pleasantly warm and dry microclimate. Credit: Marcin Wiklik/iStock To keep the body warm and dry during winter sports, high-performance clothing is a must. The demands on these textiles are high, as a person sweats up to one liter per hour on his upper body alone when skiing. A new technology, co-developed by a team of Empa scientists, helps athletes sweating by actively transporting moisture…

360-degree panoramic view via single-sensor matrix

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a new solution for thermal infrared applications, making it possible to fold a 360-degree panoramic view on a single sensor matrix. The concept guaranteeing optimal image quality is especially suitable for security, surveillance, military, and building diagnostic applications, where the objects to be imaged lie in the horizontal directions from the camera. In thermal imaging, infrared radiation emitted by objects being imaged is detected and used for showing the temperature variations of…

Superconducting synapse may be missing piece for ‘artificial brains’ — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a superconducting switch that “learns” like a biological system and could connect processors and store memories in future computers operating like the human brain. The NIST switch, described in Science Advances, is called a synapse, like its biological counterpart, and it supplies a missing piece for so-called neuromorphic computers. Envisioned as a new type of artificial intelligence, such computers could boost perception and decision-making for applications such as…

Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicycles

By imitating cars and bycicles, the drone automatically learned to respect the safety rules. Credit: UZH All today’s commercial drones use GPS, which works fine above building roofs and in high altitudes. But what, when the drones have to navigate autonomously at low altitude among tall buildings or in the dense, unstructured city streets with cars, cyclists or pedestrians suddenly crossing their way? Until now, commercial drones are not able to quickly react to such unforeseen events. Researchers of the…

Automating Production Operations by Building a Smart Mini Fridge |

In the Wayfair Network Operations Center (NOC) we wear a lot of hats: Code Deployers, Debuggers, Production Triage, and Incident Coordination, to name a few. Just this month we’ve responded to an average of 256 alerts a day and are staffed 24×7 with a team spanning two continents, servicing several locations. At the end of a long day of deploying code and ensuring production stability, nothing beats an ice-cold beer/cider/seltzer/soda from our very own NOC Fridge. Our intrepid Director of…

Maine robotics company competing for major Army contract

A Maine robotics company is one of four companies competing to build the Army’s next generation of battlefield support vehicles. The Army wants unmanned vehicles to reduce the burden on soldiers by carrying heavy ammunition and supplies into combat. The Portland Press Herald reports that the Army is expected to order thousands of the units by 2020. Waterboro-based Howe and Howe Technologies said its unmanned, tracked vehicle completed a 60-mile field test in 29 hours in September and October.…