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Category: Computer Engineering

Scientists create a cellular guillotine for studying single-cell wound repair

Researchers led by Sindy Tang, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford, have created a new tool for cutting cells, called a microfluidic guillotine. This eight-channel version of their tool can cut cells over 200 times faster than conventional methods. Credit: L.A. Cicero/Stanford News Service While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It’s a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet and big enough to…

Leadership, Management, and Tribes – Square Corner Blog – Medium

There are a lot of great books about leadership and management. One is Tribes by Seth Godin, which is a great read for any aspiring leader. Tribes talks a lot about leaders versus managers and, as an Engineering Manager, it got me thinking about my own views on leadership and management. Every organization needs great leaders as well as great managers, but are they the same people? And what role do they play? Given that entire books can be written…

Researchers use head related transfer functions to personalize audio in mixed and virtual reality

Credit: Microsoft Move your head left, now right. The way you hear and interpret the sounds around you changes as you move. That’s how sound in the real world works. Now imagine if it worked that way while you were listening to a recording of a concert or playing a video game in virtual reality. During Acoustics ’17 Boston, the third joint meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the European Acoustics Association being held June 25-29, in Boston,…

Mistake in Yellow and Gray

Texas has always been a forward-looking state, where things are always going to get better and history doesn’t count for much.  The spirit of the state is well expressed by GM engineer and inventor Charles F. Kettering, who said in 1948, “My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there.”  So it’s natural to expect that this bias toward novelty would show up in architecture.  The problem with novelty in architecture…

China drone king turns to farming

Drone maker DJI was founded in 2006 in an apartment in Shenzhen by a young graduate with a passion for model planes and now makes almost two-thirds of the world’s civilian drones China drone-maker DJI is betting on flying machines that shoot pesticide instead of photos to fend off growing competition in the global remote-controlled aircraft market. The world leader in the civilian drones sector is switching its focus from leisure photography to more professional uses for its unmanned aerial…

Wearable technology could save lives and dollars in construction industry

At first glance, there’s nothing remarkable about SolePower’s latest work boot prototype. The Pittsburgh-based startup has gone through at least 20 other iterations of the boot, and this one took about six months to create. The footwear looks normal – all black save for the company’s white and green logo. But after a few steps, rectangular sections in the heels illuminate a bright orange, reminiscent of the lights inside a traffic tunnel. That’s when you know they’re charging. …

Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory discovered that they could functionalize magnetic materials through a thoroughly unlikely method, by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy. It was so unlikely they called it a “counterintuitive experimental finding” in their published work on the research. “People don’t talk much about scandium when they are talking magnetism, because there has not been much reason to,” said Yaroslav Mudryk, an Associate Scientist at Ames Laboratory.…

Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring

Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas have developed a wearable diagnostic biosensor that can detect three interconnected, diabetes-related compounds — cortisol, glucose and interleukin-6 — in perspired sweat for up to a week without loss of signal integrity. The team envisions that their wearable devices will contain a small transceiver to send data to an application installed on a cellphone. Credit: University of Texas at Dallas Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are getting more out…

Explaining Challenges to Patent Validity (and a looming threat)

We’ve written a couple times about the problem of patent trolls, and what we are doing in response to the first case a troll filed against Cloudflare. We set a goal to find prior art on all 38 Blackbird Tech patents and applications and then obtain a legal determination that Blackbird Tech’s patents are invalid. Such a determination will end Blackbird’s ability to file or threaten to file abusive patent claims, against us or anyone else. CC BY-SA 2.0 image…

Scientists design unique energy absorbing container

The unique energy absorbing container designed by SPbPU scientists. Credit: Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University Computer-Aided Engineering Centre of Excellence (CompMechLab) Researchers have developed a technology to ensure the safety and efficiency of fragile equipment like high-precision devices weighing up to 8 kg when dropped from 125 meters height to a hard surface. It’s a protective container with world’s best energy absorption characteristics designed and manufactured at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University Computer-Aided Engineering Centre of…