.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Chemical Engineering

Researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells — ScienceDaily

Whether healthy or diseased, human cells exhibit behaviors and processes that are largely dictated by growth factor molecules, which bind to receptors on the cells. For example, growth factors tell the cells to divide, move, and when to die — a process known as apoptosis. When growth factor levels are too high or too low, or when cells respond irregularly to their directions, many diseases can result, including cancer. “It is believed that cells respond to growth factors at extreme…

Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements — ScienceDaily

Until now, carbon dioxide has been dumped in oceans or buried underground. Industry has been reluctant to implement carbon dioxide scrubbers in facilities due to cost and footprint. What if we could not only capture carbon dioxide, but convert it into something useful? S. Komar Kawatra and his students have tackled that challenge, and they’re having some success. A team lead by Kawatra, a professor of chemical engineering at Michigan Technological University, his PhD students, Sriram Valluri and Victor Claremboux,…

Salk scientists identify possible healing compound in Yerba santa — ScienceDaily

The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. A Salk Institute discovery of a potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory chemical in a native California shrub may lead to a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease based on a compound found in nature. The research appears in the February 2019 issue of the journal Redox Biology. “Alzheimer’s disease is a leading cause of death in the United States,” says Senior Staff Scientist Pamela Maher, a member of Salk’s…

Send your favorite chemist a #labsafety valentine

Posted By Jyllian Kemsley on Feb 14, 2019 in Featured | Credit: Shutterstock University of California, San Francisco, chemical hygiene officer Caroline Hedge started a thread on lab safety valentines on Twitter, and they were too clever not to share. 💌 @CM_HedgeRoses are redFire is tooReview the SOPEspecially if you’re new 🤢 @CM_HedgeYour eyes are redYou don’t feel goodGet off the benchAnd work in the hood 👀 @AlexFGoldbergmy eyes are itchygave them a ruboh no it’s burningdidn’t…

Insulating crust kept cryomagma liquid for millions of years on nearby dwarf planet — ScienceDaily

A recent NASA mission to the dwarf planet Ceres found brilliant, white spots of salts on its surface. New research led by The University of Texas at Austin in partnership with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) delved into the factors that influenced the volcanic activity that formed the distinctive spots and that could play a key role in mixing the ingredients for life on other worlds. The volcanoes on Ceres are cryovolcanoes, a type of volcano that forms on planetary…

Pushing the bounds of vision could reveal hidden worlds

Infrared glasses would give firefighters heightened visual perception to locate people trapped in a blaze. Image Credit – Amplify project Nature is complex – often too complex for humans to see. But squint-controlled glasses that let people see 3-D thermal images and a camera that can capture the inner workings of high-speed chemical reactions are helping to push the limits of human perception. Human senses have already been highly tuned by millions of years of evolution. Our eyes, for example,…

Antarctic meltwater streams shed light on longstanding hydrological mystery — ScienceDaily

In one of the coldest, driest places on Earth, CU Boulder scientists have developed a possible answer to a longstanding mystery about the chemistry of streamflow, which may have broad implications for watersheds and water quality around the world. The new study conducted in Antarctica’s arid McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) region examined the nearly ubiquitous phenomenon that streams in all climates, regardless of their flow rate, tend to maintain a remarkably consistent concentration of dissolved minerals as they move through…

Continent origins revealed in search for missing niobium — ScienceDaily

In his free time last summer, Rice University geoscientist Ming Tang made a habit of comparing the niobium content in various rocks in a global minerals database. What he found was worth skipping a few nights out with friends. In a paper published this month by Nature Communications, Tang, Rice petrologist Cin-Ty Lee and colleagues offered an answer to one of Earth science’s fundamental questions: Where do continents form? “If our conclusions are correct, every piece of land that we…

New method yields higher transition temperature in superconducting materials — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new way to raise the transition temperature of superconducting materials, boosting the temperature at which the superconductors are able to operate. The results, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest a previously unexplored avenue for achieving higher-temperature superconductivity, which offers a number of potential benefits to energy generators and consumers. Electric current can move through superconducting materials without resistance, while traditional transmission materials lose as much as…

New technology can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes — ScienceDaily

More than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas, which is why access to clean water is one of the National Academy of Engineering’s Grand Challenges. Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have designed a novel membrane technology that purifies water while preventing biofouling, or buildup of bacteria and other harmful microorganisms that reduce the flow of water. And they…