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Category: Chemical Engineering

MU Awards $260,000 to Accelerate Biomedical Discoveries from Lab to Market

College of Engineering Dean Elizabeth Loboa talks to Roger Fales and John Pardalos at the Coulter Awards & Mixer at the School of Medicine Nov. 5. The University of Missouri’s Coulter Biomedical Accelerator Program awarded four grants totaling $260,000 to help promising medical discoveries make the transition from laboratory research to commercial investment and direct patient care. The grants were announced at an awards ceremony on Nov. 5 at the MU School of Medicine. “The success of the Coulter Program…

Renovating History: Shamrock Plaza and Medallion Reconstruction Underway

The original shamrock medallion, installed in 1921, showed signs of wear and tear and needed more than a fresh coat of paint. For the past few weeks, faculty, staff and alumni who walk by the Shamrock Plaza on the east side of Lafferre Hall have been asking what happened to the green and white shamrock medallion at the heart of the plaza.  On October 19, the shamrock was removed and the concrete around it was demolished as part of the…

College hosts third annual Diverse Engineering Professionals Conference

Tojan Rahhal (left), Assistant Dean for Inclusive Excellence and Strategic Initiatives, poses with members of the Engineering Diversity Collaborative Evonne Weeden, Brooke Flynn, Kate Clemens, Victoria Sanchez, Jacqueline Miller, Andrew Guardia and Samantha Sample, along with Hilary Mueller, Director of the Office Diversity and Outreach Initiatives, during a break at the Diverse Engineering Professionals Conference Oct. 26. Collaborative members Ronell Jones II and Alexis Leonard were unable to attend due to a conflict. The Diverse Engineering Professionals Conference, or DEPC,…

The process could work on the gas at any concentrations, from power plant emissions to open air — ScienceDaily

A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere. Most methods of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of gas require higher concentrations, such as those found in the flue emissions from fossil fuel-based power plants. A few variations…

MU recognized for innovative culture

The University of Missouri is unique in terms of collaborative research, with engineering, medicine and veterinary medicine schools in one location—something only 10 universities in the country can claim on a single campus. The combination of these resources — as well as those provided by schools such as law, journalism, business, and arts and science—positions Mizzou to be a global leader in translational research. By working together, researchers are able to take results from the lab and quickly turn it…

Origin and chemical makeup of Saturn’s Moon Titan’s dunes — ScienceDaily

A team led by a University of Hawaii at Manoa chemistry professor and researcher has been able to provide answers to key questions about the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan. Physical chemist Ralf I. Kaiser and fellow researchers examined remote sensing data regarding NASA’s Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan — the only solar system body besides Earth with a solid surface, lakes and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of about 1.5 atmosphere at surface level. Images and data from Cassini-Huygens…

Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected — ScienceDaily

A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world’s most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought. The study published October 10, 2019, in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters. “Right now, policy makers generally assume that polystyrene lasts forever in the environment,” says Collin Ward, a marine chemist at WHOI and lead author of the study.…

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury — ScienceDaily

A blow to the head or powerful shock wave on the battlefield can cause immediate, significant damage to a person’s skull and the tissue beneath it. But the trauma does not stop there. The impact sets off a chemical reaction in the brain that ravages neurons and the networks that supply them with nutrients and oxygen. It is the secondary effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to long-term cognitive, psychological and motor system damage, that piqued the…

Researchers envision a patient-specific ‘oncology diet’ to exploit the weakness — ScienceDaily

A research team from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports it has discovered a metabolic vulnerability in multiple types of cancer cells that bear a common genetic mutation affecting cellular machines called spliceosomes. In test tube and mouse experiments, the researchers learned that the resulting spliceosome malfunction cripples the cells’ chemical process for generating the amino acid serine, making the cancer cells dependent on external (dietary) sources of the amino acid. When mice were fed a serine-restricted diet, their…

Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age — ScienceDaily

About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth’s poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species evolving. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study in Science Advances argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a…