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Category: Chemical Engineering

Tiny fossils unlock clues to Earth’s climate half a billion years ago — ScienceDaily

An international collaboration of scientists, led by the University of Leicester, has investigated Earth’s climate over half a billion years ago by combining climate models and chemical analyses of fossil shells about 1mm long. The research, published in Science Advances, suggests that early animals diversified within a climate similar to that in which the dinosaurs lived. This interval in time is known for the ‘Cambrian explosion’, the time during which representatives of most of the major animal groups first appear…

“Ramblings of a Chemical Engineer” eBook

Fresh and hot from the oven is my new eBook, “Ramblings of a Chemical Engineer”. Standby to DOWNLOAD this 100+ pages which is a little collection of my learning curves and experiences as an engineer. Stay tune and wait for it as I will open it for download this Sunday, 13th May 2018. posted by zaki yamani @ 5:52 PM, 0 Comments: Links to this post: << Home The Author I’m Zaki. I used to be a project, process and…

Growing ‘dead zone’ confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of Oman — ScienceDaily

New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has confirmed a dramatic decrease in oxygen in the Gulf of Oman part of the Arabian Sea. But the environmental disaster is worse than expected. The ‘dead zone’ was confirmed by underwater robots called Seagliders — which were able to collect data in areas of water previously inaccessible due to the piracy and geopolitical tensions. The robots are about the same size as a small human diver, but can reach depths…

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skin

One of the key innovations of the new 3-D-printing technique on skin is that the printer uses computer vision to track and adjust to movements in real-time. Credit: McAlpine group, University of Minnesota In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect…

Groundbreaking technology could help soldiers on the battlefield and people with skin disorders — ScienceDaily

In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics. Researchers also successfully printed biological cells on the skin wound of a mouse. The technique could lead to new medical treatments for…

Using the stimulant as a catalyst, researchers create new gels for drug delivery — ScienceDaily

Caffeine is well-known for its ability to help people stay alert, but a team of researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital has now come up with a novel use for this chemical stimulant — catalyzing the formation of polymer materials. Using caffeine as a catalyst, the researchers have devised a way to create gummy, biocompatible gels that could be used for drug delivery and other medical applications. “Most synthetic approaches for synthesizing and cross-linking polymeric gels and other…

CFRP recycling—into the battery instead of the garbage

The Fraunhofer ICT uses recycled, small chopped carbon fibers (top) to produce bipolar plates (bottom) for batteries and fuel cells. Credit: Fraunhofer ICT Carbon fiber-reinforced plastics are gaining importance as components of aircraft. The trend is increasing the need for sustainable recycling concepts. At the ILA from April 25 to 29, 2018 in Berlin, Fraunhofer will present a technology that converts recycled carbon fibers into materials for batteries and fuel cells. This saves costs, improves the CO2 balance and opens…

Certain immune cells behave differently in HIV-infected patients than they do in healthy individuals — ScienceDaily

A team of chemical and biomedical engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, have discovered that HIV-infected patients experience a dysfunction in a certain type of immune cell: the follicular helper T (Tfh) cell. In a paper published today in Science Immunology, the authors outline how, through combining a sophisticated sequencing technique with a mass cytometry method (the measurement of cell characteristics), they discovered…

Certain immune cells behave differently in HIV-infected patients than they do in healthy individuals — ScienceDaily

A team of chemical and biomedical engineers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, have discovered that HIV-infected patients experience a dysfunction in a certain type of immune cell: the follicular helper T (Tfh) cell. In a paper published today in Science Immunology, the authors outline how, through combining a sophisticated sequencing technique with a mass cytometry method (the measurement of cell characteristics), they discovered…

Brain development disorders in children linked to common environmental toxin exposures — ScienceDaily

Exposures of pregnant women and children to common thyroid-hormone-disrupting toxins may be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The review describes how numerous, common chemicals can interfere with normal thyroid hormone actions, which are essential for normal brain development in foetuses and young children, and suggests a need for greater public health intervention. Maternal thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal brain development of children and previous human studies…