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Category: Chemical Engineering

Engineering Ethics Blog: Vaping Turns Deadly

At this writing, three people have died and hundreds more have become ill from a mysterious lung ailment that is connected with certain types of e-cigarettes.  The victims typically have nausea or vomiting at first, then difficulty breathing.  Many end up in emergency rooms and hospitals because of lung damage. Most of the sufferers are young people in their teens and twenties, and all were found to have been  using vaping products in the previous three months.  Many but not…

New metal-organic framework enables capture of water from dry air 24/7 — ScienceDaily

With water scarcity a growing problem worldwide, University of California, Berkeley, researchers are close to producing a microwave-sized water harvester that will allow you to pull all the water you need directly from the air — even in the hot, dry desert. In a paper appearing this week in ACS Central Science, a journal of the American Chemical Society, UC Berkeley’s Omar Yaghi and his colleagues describe the latest version of their water harvester, which can pull more than five…

DNA damaged by high blood sugar — ScienceDaily

For years, scientists have been trying to solve a medical mystery: Why do people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing some forms of cancer? Today, researchers report a possible explanation for this double whammy. They found that DNA sustains more damage and gets fixed less often when blood sugar levels are high compared to when blood sugar is at a normal, healthy level, thereby increasing one’s cancer risk. The researchers will present their…

#Chemsafety at #ACSSanDiego – The Safety Zone

About the Safety Zone The Safety Zone covers chemical safety issues in academic and industrial research labs and in manufacturing. It is intended to be a forum for exchange and discussion of lab and plant safety and accident information without the fanfare of a news article. Read more » Source link…

Enzyme that helps protect us from stress linked to liver cancer growth — ScienceDaily

An enzyme induced by stress to help reduce production of damaging free radicals is also used by liver cancer to regulate two major cell proliferation pathways that enable the cancer to thrive, scientists report. They’ve also found that when they block the enzyme Nqo1, it dramatically reduces the proliferation of liver cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer’s ability to survive and thrive, they report in the journal HEPATOLOGY. Nqo1 is highly expressed in both their mouse model of liver cancer…

Jones makes impact with Bayer

Alyson Jones spent her summer interning with Bayer in Kansas City. Photo courtesy of Alyson Jones. MU Biomedical, Biological & Chemical Engineering undergraduate Alyson Jones maximized her engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing an internship with Bayer in Kansas City. Learn a little more about her internship in his own words. Jones: This summer with Bayer has been such an important experience for my career goals in so many ways. Chemical engineering is so broad and filled with opportunities.…

Lang learns leadership lessons from Pfizer

Kyle Lang spent his summer interning with Pfizer in St. Louis. Photo courtesy of Kyle Lang. MU Biomedical, Biological & Chemical Engineering senior Kyle Lang maximized his engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing an internship with  Pfizer in St. Louis. Learn a little more about his internship in his own words. Lang: Beyond the many technical insights into the pharmaceutical industry, the most valuable lessons from my summer with Pfizer were to relax and bring energy to the office.…

Food profilers develop new methodological approach for food analysis — ScienceDaily

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology have developed a new methodology for the simultaneous analysis of odorants and tastants. It could simplify and accelerate the quality control of food in the future. Whether a food tastes good or not is essentially determined by the interaction of odors and tastants. A few trillionths of a gram per kilogram of food is enough to perceive some odorants. Tastants, on the other hand, we…

Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis — ScienceDaily

Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed. The finding could mean the evolution of photosynthesis needs a rethink, turning traditional ideas on their head. Photosynthesis is the ability to use the Sun’s energy to produce sugars via chemical reactions. Plants, algae, and some bacteria today perform ‘oxygenic’ photosynthesis, which splits water into oxygen and hydrogen to power the process, releasing oxygen as a waste product. Some…

Atmosphere of midsize planet revealed by Hubble, Spitzer — ScienceDaily

Two NASA space telescopes have teamed up to identify, for the first time, the detailed chemical “fingerprint” of a planet between the sizes of Earth and Neptune. No planets like this can be found in our own solar system, but they are common around other stars. The planet, Gliese 3470 b (also known as GJ 3470 b), may be a cross between Earth and Neptune, with a large rocky core buried under a deep, crushing hydrogen-and-helium atmosphere. Weighing in at…