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Category: Chemical Engineering

Origin and chemical makeup of Saturn’s Moon Titan’s dunes — ScienceDaily

A team led by a University of Hawaii at Manoa chemistry professor and researcher has been able to provide answers to key questions about the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan. Physical chemist Ralf I. Kaiser and fellow researchers examined remote sensing data regarding NASA’s Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan — the only solar system body besides Earth with a solid surface, lakes and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of about 1.5 atmosphere at surface level. Images and data from Cassini-Huygens…

Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected — ScienceDaily

A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world’s most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought. The study published October 10, 2019, in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters. “Right now, policy makers generally assume that polystyrene lasts forever in the environment,” says Collin Ward, a marine chemist at WHOI and lead author of the study.…

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury — ScienceDaily

A blow to the head or powerful shock wave on the battlefield can cause immediate, significant damage to a person’s skull and the tissue beneath it. But the trauma does not stop there. The impact sets off a chemical reaction in the brain that ravages neurons and the networks that supply them with nutrients and oxygen. It is the secondary effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to long-term cognitive, psychological and motor system damage, that piqued the…

Researchers envision a patient-specific ‘oncology diet’ to exploit the weakness — ScienceDaily

A research team from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports it has discovered a metabolic vulnerability in multiple types of cancer cells that bear a common genetic mutation affecting cellular machines called spliceosomes. In test tube and mouse experiments, the researchers learned that the resulting spliceosome malfunction cripples the cells’ chemical process for generating the amino acid serine, making the cancer cells dependent on external (dietary) sources of the amino acid. When mice were fed a serine-restricted diet, their…

Dust from a giant asteroid crash caused an ancient ice age — ScienceDaily

About 466 million years ago, long before the age of the dinosaurs, the Earth froze. The seas began to ice over at the Earth’s poles, and the new range of temperatures around the planet set the stage for a boom of new species evolving. The cause of this ice age was a mystery, until now: a new study in Science Advances argues that the ice age was caused by global cooling, triggered by extra dust in the atmosphere from a…

Employers reach more than 1,000 Mizzou Engineers

Information Technology senior Danae Nash was one of more than 1,000 estimated students to speak with employers at Tuesday’s Fall Career Fair. Photo by Liz Lannin. Hundreds of booths, all in neatly apportioned rows with a backdrop of black and gold drapes, dotted MizzouRec on Tuesday afternoon. These booths were populated with recruiters from all manner of companies, all of whom came in search of engineers — the kind of world-class future engineering leaders only Mizzou Engineering can provide. More…

Engineering Ethics Blog: Vaping Turns Deadly

At this writing, three people have died and hundreds more have become ill from a mysterious lung ailment that is connected with certain types of e-cigarettes.  The victims typically have nausea or vomiting at first, then difficulty breathing.  Many end up in emergency rooms and hospitals because of lung damage. Most of the sufferers are young people in their teens and twenties, and all were found to have been  using vaping products in the previous three months.  Many but not…

New metal-organic framework enables capture of water from dry air 24/7 — ScienceDaily

With water scarcity a growing problem worldwide, University of California, Berkeley, researchers are close to producing a microwave-sized water harvester that will allow you to pull all the water you need directly from the air — even in the hot, dry desert. In a paper appearing this week in ACS Central Science, a journal of the American Chemical Society, UC Berkeley’s Omar Yaghi and his colleagues describe the latest version of their water harvester, which can pull more than five…

DNA damaged by high blood sugar — ScienceDaily

For years, scientists have been trying to solve a medical mystery: Why do people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing some forms of cancer? Today, researchers report a possible explanation for this double whammy. They found that DNA sustains more damage and gets fixed less often when blood sugar levels are high compared to when blood sugar is at a normal, healthy level, thereby increasing one’s cancer risk. The researchers will present their…

#Chemsafety at #ACSSanDiego – The Safety Zone

About the Safety Zone The Safety Zone covers chemical safety issues in academic and industrial research labs and in manufacturing. It is intended to be a forum for exchange and discussion of lab and plant safety and accident information without the fanfare of a news article. Read more » Source link…