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Category: Chemical Engineering

Study shows all halide perovskites inherently unstable, requiring great attention to environment — ScienceDaily

University of California, Berkeley, scientists have created a blue light-emitting diode (LED) from a trendy new semiconductor material, halide perovskite, overcoming a major barrier to employing these cheap, easy-to-make materials in electronic devices. In the process, however, the researchers discovered a fundamental property of halide perovskites that may prove a barrier to their widespread use as solar cells and transistors. Alternatively, this unique property may open up a whole new world for perovskites far beyond that of today’s standard semiconductors.…

Hunt Wins National Continuing Educator Award

Mizzou Engineering Associate Prof. and E-Learning Strategic Initiatives Fellow Heather Hunt in the Department of Biomedical, Biological & Chemical Engineering has won the 2020 Adelle F. Robertson Emerging Professional Continuing Educator Award from the University Professional & Continuing Educator Association (UPCEA). Hunt received the honor for her work with the Biological Engineering Online MSNT program and her work in eLearning in general. She worked with instructional designers to create engaging and innovative bioengineering courses that have impressed both students and her department. Hunt…

Chemical bond making and breaking recorded in action — ScienceDaily

Ever since it was proposed that atoms are building blocks of the world, scientists have been trying to understand how and why they bond to each other. Be it a molecule (which is a group of atoms joined together in a particular fashion), or a block of material or a whole living organism, ultimately, everything is controlled by the way atoms bond, and the way bonds break. The challenge is that lengths of chemical bonds are between 0.1 — 0.3…

Minimizing Power-Supply Voltage Drop on PCBs

Despite the widespread availability and use of low-power components, today’s printed circuit boards (PCBs) can require a significant amount of current, with boards drawing 50, 100, and even 200 A in common use. Whenever current is delivered to a load, there will be IR-based voltage drop, and designers must take this loss into account when laying out the board and placing the supply, dc supply rails, and loads. For consistent and reliable operation, it’s important to ensure this drop doesn’t…

Researchers One Step Closer to Mimicking Blood Brain Barrier on a Chip

The blood brain barrier (BBB) in humans consists of blood vessels and tissues that regulate the passage of chemicals and other substances going from the bloodstream into the brain. It does a good job of keeping potentially harmful molecules from crossing over and affecting the central nervous system. The downside is that if clinicians need to treat a brain problem, such as toxic chemical exposure or a tumor, it’s difficult to get therapeutic drugs across that barrier to do their…

Shocked meteorites provide clues to Earth’s lower mantle — ScienceDaily

Deep below the Earth’s surface lies a thick rocky layer called the mantle, which makes up the majority of our planet’s volume. While Earth’s mantle is too deep for humans to observe directly, certain meteorites can provide clues to this unreachable layer. In a study recently published in Science Advances, an international team of scientists, including Sang-Heon Dan Shim and Thomas Sharp of Arizona State University (ASU), have completed a complex analysis of a “shocked meteorite” (one that has experienced…

New Material Opens the Door to Next-6G Electronics

Millions of cellphone users might not know it, but their phones rely on a small barium-strontium titanate (BST) part to tune into signals for clear reception. That’s all well and good, but researchers know that while today’s cellphones, including the newest 5G phones, operate at frequencies below 6 GHz, the next wave of 5G phones and anticipated 6G cellular communications will operate at frequencies above 30 GHz where BST doesn’t perform well. Fortunately, a group of engineers at Cornell University…

Predictive vs. Preventive Maintenance: Which is Best?

Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have looked for ways to determine how the properties of electronic and optical materials can be harnessed to develop ultrasensitive sensors for measuring electric and magnetic fields. Their solution? Turning the natural atomic flaws inside diamond anvils into sensors. Since their invention more than 60 years ago, diamond anvil cells have let engineers recreate extreme pressures such as those deep inside the Earth’s mantle, or to enable chemical reactions that can only be…

Performance benchmark for quantum computers — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a quantum chemistry simulation benchmark to evaluate the performance of quantum devices and guide the development of applications for future quantum computers. Their findings were published in npj Quantum Information. Quantum computers use the laws of quantum mechanics and units known as qubits to greatly increase the threshold at which information can be transmitted and processed. Whereas traditional “bits” have a value of either 0 or 1, qubits…

Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus — ScienceDaily

Life as we know it requires phosphorus. It’s one of the six main chemical elements of life, it forms the backbone of DNA and RNA molecules, acts as the main currency for energy in all cells and anchors the lipids that separate cells from their surrounding environment. But how did a lifeless environment on the early Earth supply this key ingredient? “For 50 years, what’s called ‘the phosphate problem,’ has plagued studies on the origin of life,” said first author…