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Category: Chemical Engineering

Scientists restore some functions in a pig’s brain hours after death — ScienceDaily

Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig’s brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 18 in the journal Nature. The brain of a postmortem pig obtained from a meatpacking plant was isolated and circulated with a specially designed chemical solution. Many basic cellular functions, once thought to cease seconds or minutes after oxygen and…

Smart antioxidant-containing polymer responds to body chemistry, environment — ScienceDaily

Oxidants found within living organisms are byproducts of metabolism and are essential to wound-healing and immunity. However, when their concentrations become too high, inflammation and tissue damage can occur. University of Illinois engineers have developed and tested a new drug-delivery system that senses high oxidant levels and responds by administering just the right amount of antioxidant to restore this delicate balance. The findings are published in the journal Small. Many pharmaceuticals include specialized polymers and particles that control the timing…

Quintet shines at Research and Creative Activities Forum

Clockwise from top left: Mitch Bellrichard, Shishi Chen, Behnam Jahangiri Koohbanani, Amir Mehdi Mofrad and Nasibeh Zanjirani Farahani. Five Mizzou Engineering graduate students participated in the Research and Creative Activities Forum on Friday at Jesse Hall. The event was sponsored by the MU Graduate Professional Council, and the forum’s stated goal is “to showcase research and creative activities while providing valuable experience and feedback.” “I really appreciated the GPC for providing this great opportunity,” Civil and Environmental Engineering graduate student…

Scientists have combined the simplicity of paper with the complexity of quantum physics for point-of-care testing — ScienceDaily

Paper-based diagnostic tests are cheap, convenient and biodegradable. However, their use is limited by conventional dyes — which are not bright enough to show trace amounts of analyte, are prone to fading, and can be environmentally toxic. Now researchers are using quantum physics to overcome these limitations, says a review published in Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. The bizarre optical properties of tiny metal particles — smaller than light waves — can be captured on paper to detect even a…

From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins — ScienceDaily

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers’ goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response. Almost all biological molecules exist as two different spatial structures that are related to each other like image and mirror image. These molecules…

Love of Mizzou, family sparks diversity and inclusion gift

Ken Donohew and Ellen Kippel, front, established the Major General Jack N. Donohew Fund for Diversity and Inclusion in Engineering as part of Mizzou Giving Day 2019. Photo courtesy of Ken Donohew and Ellen Kippel. Mizzou runs deep in Ken Donohew’s family. The 1967 industrial engineering graduate counts his father, mother, two aunts, an uncle, a second cousin and grandfather as relatives holding an MU degree. Love of Mizzou is a family tradition, and he and wife Ellen Kippel have…

Unique Weyl semimetal delivers largest intrinsic conversion of light to electricity — ScienceDaily

A recently discovered Weyl semimetal delivers the largest intrinsic conversion of light to electricity of any material, an international team lead by a group of Boston College researchers reports today in the journal Nature Materials. The discovery is based on a unique aspect of the material where electrons can be separated by their chirality, or handedness — similar to DNA. The findings may offer a new route to efficient generation of electricity from light, as well as for thermal or…

Bipartisanship Isn’t Dead, At Least About PFAS

Anyone who pays attention to U. S. news these days cannot be blamed for assuming that bipartisanship—specifically, the joint sponsorship of bills by both Democrats and Republicans—is ancient history, maybe even to the extent that they’ve installed separate Democratic and Republican bathrooms at the Capitol.  But a small glimmer of bipartisanship came last Friday when seven Democratic senators and an equal number of Republicans introduced a bill to classify a group of chemicals known as PFAS as toxic and worthy…

Go-anywhere cleanroom

CAPE is as flexible as a tent, providing an ultra-clean manufacturing environment that complies with air cleanliness standards all the way up to ISO class 1. Credit: Fraunhofer IPA/Rainer Bez CAPE is a transportable, tent-like cleanroom facility developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA. It can be installed both indoors and in unexposed outdoor locations, and takes less than an hour to set up. The inspiration for this innovative new development came from a…

Researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells — ScienceDaily

Whether healthy or diseased, human cells exhibit behaviors and processes that are largely dictated by growth factor molecules, which bind to receptors on the cells. For example, growth factors tell the cells to divide, move, and when to die — a process known as apoptosis. When growth factor levels are too high or too low, or when cells respond irregularly to their directions, many diseases can result, including cancer. “It is believed that cells respond to growth factors at extreme…