.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Biomedical Engineering

MU Engineering alum uncovers a GEM

Dominic Romero’s hard work led him to great success both in the classroom and in the lab of Bioengineering Professor Sheila Grant during his time at Mizzou. And that hard work landed the recent MU Engineering alum a prestigious fellowship as he works to further his education. Dominic Romero recently was selected as a GEM Fellow, landing a $8,000 living stipend per semester, up to two paid summer internships with a GEM employer member and full tuition and fees at…

In mice, the same changes to sperm miRNAs occur and are transmitted to the next generation — ScienceDaily

Exposure to early life trauma can lead to poor physical and mental health in some individuals, which can be passed on to their children. Studies in mice show that at least some of the effects of stress can be transmitted to offspring via environmentally-induced changes in sperm miRNA levels. A new epigenetics study raises the possibility that the same is true in humans. It shows for the first time that the levels of the same two sperm miRNAs change in…

Graphene surface allows researchers to control cell behavior with light — a technique that could speed the search for more precise, less toxic therapeutic drugs — ScienceDaily

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes. The method, described in the May 18…

Emergency contact info helps researchers branch out family tree — ScienceDaily

When you go to the doctor or hospital, one piece of information that you’re always asked to provide — in addition to your name, address, and insurance information — is an emergency contact. Often, that person is a blood relative. Now, a collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals’ electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. Those family…

MU’s Xu lands unique NIH grant

Most approved research grants have a very limited focus, with funding going toward achieving a very specific goal and that goal only. The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) wanted to turn that idea on its head by finding worthwhile bodies of research to fund — in other words, if its related to a researcher’s general research topic, this money can support it. Dong Xu, interim co-chair of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department…

Mizzou Engineer computes the right fit

Yasmin Kassim was selected by the Iraqi government to complete her Ph.D. in the United States. She was placed at the University of Missouri in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department (EECS), where she has worked in the CIVA lab, supervised by Professor Kannappan Palaniappan. Photos courtesy of Yasmin Kassim. Yasmin Kassim’s love of computer science began as a child in Baghdad, tagging along to her father’s workplace. That love has taken her to the brink of her Ph.D., led…

College of Engineering’s first Research Day showcases strengths

Dean Elizabeth Loboa joined with Research Day keynote faculty speakers Prasad Calyam, Bret Ulery and Bill Buttlar and co-organizer Praveen Edara for a photo after the first-ever Research Day concluded. Robots, food waste, cardiovascular health, vaccinations, transportation, neurological health, thermal structure imaging, utilizing Big Data for traffic management. This is just a microcosm of the research topics being undertaken by University of Missouri College of Engineering researchers and students. And they were all on full display at the College’s first-ever…

Electrode shape improves neurostimulation for small targets

This small chip holds a 2-D electrode with a shape that can better stimulate small targets in the body over time. Credit: Purdue University image/Kayla Wiles A cross-like shape helps the electrodes of implantable neurostimulation devices to deliver more charge to specific areas of the nervous system, possibly prolonging device life span, says research published in March in Scientific Reports. The shape, called “fractal,” would be particularly useful for stimulating smaller areas, such as deep brain structures or the retina,…

When there’s an audience, people’s performance improves — ScienceDaily

Often people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist found the opposite: being watched makes people do better. When people know they are being observed, parts of the brain associated with social awareness and reward invigorate a part of the brain that controls motor skills, improving their performance at skilled tasks. The findings, which could help people become more effective in the workplace and in…

The brittle material can turn flexible when made into ultrafine needles — ScienceDaily

Diamond is well-known as the strongest of all natural materials, and with that strength comes another tightly linked property: brittleness. But now, an international team of researchers from MIT, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Korea has found that when grown in extremely tiny, needle-like shapes, diamond can bend and stretch, much like rubber, and snap back to its original shape. The surprising finding is being reported this week in the journal Science, in a paper by senior author Ming Dao, a…