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Category: Biomedical Engineering

UB researchers compared retired Buffalo Bills and Buffalo Sabres players to non-contact sport athletes — ScienceDaily

-New University at Buffalo research is adding important information to the body of knowledge about the cognitive and behavioral status of a group of retired professional athletes who spent their careers in contact sports. The study findings, from UB’s Healthy Aging Mind Project, were published today online before print in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. The study assessed 21 professional athletes retired from the National Football League and the National Hockey League on neuropsychological measures associated with mild cognitive…

Researchers open the door to potential new therapies for certain metabolic and muscular diseases — ScienceDaily

Abundant in human babies and small mammals, brown adipose tissue (BAT), or brown fat, was only recently discovered in human adults, and its role remains unclear. Known to play an integral part in generating body heat and burning stored energy, its presence is linked to lower body weight and improved blood sugar levels, making it an attractive research target for potential treatments for diabetes, obesity and other metabolic diseases. Now, endocrinologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have shown…

A new University of Delaware study is the first to examine the effect of headers on balance. These repetitive head impacts could have the potential to cause subtle neurological deficit — ScienceDaily

When France and Croatia go head to head in the World Cup final on Sunday, fans may want to see which team really has their head in the game. Soccer players who head the ball may be more likely to experience short-term balance problems, suggesting that repetitive head impacts could have the potential to cause subtle neurological deficits not previously known, according to a preliminary study by University of Delaware researchers. More research is needed to understand the long-term effects…

MU professor’s glaucoma modeling reaches breakthrough

MU Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professor Giovanna Guidoboni has been working on building models to help formalize the cause and effect mechanisms and hypotheses of clinicians throughout her career. She and her research group’s most recent breakthrough came when their theoretical predictions in the realm of glaucoma were confirmed by a population-based study of nearly 10,000 subjects. Glaucoma is a disease of the eye wherein the optic nerve degenerates progressively, potentially causing blindness if not treated rapidly. Giovanna Guidoboni…

Mizzou, UM System ready to lead precision medicine revolution

Jamie Arndt, second from left, addresses a question as fellow panelists (from left) Sheila Grant, Rob Paul, Satish Nair, Mike Nichols and Peter Tonellato look on during Wednesday’s Precision Medicine Summit. Photos by Brandan Haskell. Precision medicine is the future, and Mizzou is ready to lead. MU hosted the Precision Medicine Summit on Wednesday, which brought exceptional faculty from MU as well as Missouri-Kansas City, Missouri-St. Louis, and Missouri S&T to highlight the breadth and quality of translational precision medicine…

Technology enables soft contact lenses to monitor glucose, medical conditions and deliver medications

Purdue University researchers combined a commercial soft contact lens with an ultrathin conformal sensor circuit. Credit: Purdue University Purdue University researchers have developed soft contact lenses that not only correct vision but also can monitor glucose and medical conditions and be used for ocular pain relief or drug delivery. Sensors or other technology previously couldn’t be used for soft contact lenses because the technology required a rigid, planar surface incompatible with the soft, curved shape of a contact lens. …

How dragonfly larvae could inspire more effective artificial heart valves

Exuvia of a larva of a dragonfly. Credit: Public Domain The way dragonfly larvae control the water jets they use to move and breathe could have a range of engineering and medical applications, according to new research. Published today in Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, the study from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), examined how Anisopteran dragonfly larvae control and adjust the repetitive water jets flowing through their posterior openings. The larvae have active tri-leaflet valves, with independent control over…

AI-based method could speed development of specialized nanoparticles — ScienceDaily

A new technique developed by MIT physicists could someday provide a way to custom-design multilayered nanoparticles with desired properties, potentially for use in displays, cloaking systems, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists tackle a variety of thorny research problems, in ways that could in some cases be orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. The innovation uses computational neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, to “learn” how a nanoparticle’s structure affects its behavior, in this case the…

Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasounds

Millions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies—and with slightly different timing. This new knowledge brings us one step closer to solving the puzzle. A few years ago, Josefin Starkhammar, a researcher in biomedical engineering at Lund University,…

MU Engineering alum uncovers a GEM

Dominic Romero’s hard work led him to great success both in the classroom and in the lab of Bioengineering Professor Sheila Grant during his time at Mizzou. And that hard work landed the recent MU Engineering alum a prestigious fellowship as he works to further his education. Dominic Romero recently was selected as a GEM Fellow, landing a $8,000 living stipend per semester, up to two paid summer internships with a GEM employer member and full tuition and fees at…