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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Materials, creativity create potent mix in novel NSF REU

Camden Boyle participated in the Creative Approaches to Materials Design and Processing REU site. It’s one of three REU sites hosted by Mizzou Engineering, and this particular version is in its second year of funding. Photo by Liz Lannin. Take several eager undergraduates, a huge helping of cutting-edge materials science research and a dose of theater-based creativity and mix them all together — what do you get? One unique and highly educational National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program.…

Valleroy takes flight with Textron Aviation

Zachary Valleroy spent his summer as an intern with Textron Aviation. Photo courtesy of Zachary Valleroy. MU Biomedical, Biological & Chemical Engineering senior Zachary Valleroy — who has a double major in physics — maximized his engineering and leadership skills this summer, landing an internship with Textron Aviation in Wichita, Kan. Learn a little more about his internship in his own words. Valleroy: This summer at Textron Aviation, I had the opportunity to work in a cross-functional team to perform control…

Mizzou Engineering’s Kannan earns major award from UM System

Raghuraman Kannan recently earned the UM System President’s Award for Economic Development. Recently, the UM System announced the winners of its 2019 President’s Awards, which are given by President Mun Choi in recognition of faculty who have done exceptional work to advance the mission of the System. Mizzou Associate Professor of Biomedical, Biological & Chemical Engineering Raghuraman Kannan was one of 12 awardees, earning the President’s Award for Economic Development. Here’s what the UM System had to say about his…

Take a bath 90 minutes before bedtime to get better sleep — ScienceDaily

Biomedical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin may have found a way for people to get better shuteye. Systematic review protocols — a method used to search for and analyze relevant data — allowed researchers to analyze thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality. Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering found that bathing 1-2 hours before bedtime in water of about 104-109 degrees Fahrenheit can…

Biologist leads pioneering study on stress — ScienceDaily

A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Dopamine is a chemical in the brain that is important for learning and memory. Department of Biological Sciences Assistant Professor Christine Lattin, and colleagues conducted this study of wild songbirds showing that dopamine is important in responding…

By sharing life lessons, Mizzou’s Rogers shapes future engineers

Reg Rogers should be dead. He was involved in an automobile accident with an 18-wheeler about 20 years ago and, as he tells it, was anticipated dead on arrival. But after 14 hours of surgery, he survived. Reg Rogers recently earned the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences from the American Chemical Society for the Northeast Region. The mindset of a survivor informs his life’s work as a researcher and educator, currently with the…

Nearing a new generation of pain management

The device’s smaller size and lower weight make it easier for animals to wear and move around comfortably, enabling full implantation on even small animals such as mice. Photo courtesy of Yi Zhang. Treatment of chronic pain, diabetes, nerve damage and many other debilitating diseases that affect millions globally would benefit from medicine and pain management methods targeting the source of the pain. And an interdisciplinary team, including Mizzou Engineering’s Yi Zhang, is one step closer to making such a…

Superhydrophobic ‘nanoflower’ for biomedical applications — ScienceDaily

Plant leaves have a natural superpower — they’re designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit to the biomedical field. Researchers in Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar’s lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering have developed a “lotus effect” by incorporating atomic defects…

Re-engineered device offers clinically accurate eye scans at a fraction of the cost — ScienceDaily

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad. Thanks to a redesigned, 3D-printed spectrometer, the scanner is 15 times lighter and smaller than current commercial systems and is made from parts costing less than a tenth the retail price of commercial systems — all without sacrificing imaging quality. In its first clinical trial, the new OCT scanner…

Making the ‘human-body internet’ more effective

Experiment setup to understand how characteristics of human body communication can be improved. Credit: Dairoku Muramatsu & Yoshifumi Nishida, Source: Equivalent Circuit Model Viewed from Receiver Side in Human Body Communication Wireless technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have made remote connectivity easier, and as electronics become smaller and faster, the adoption of “wearables” has increased. From smart watches to implantables, such devices interact with the human body in ways that are very different from those of a computer. However,…