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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Biologist leads pioneering study on stress — ScienceDaily

A biologist at Louisiana State University conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Dopamine is a chemical in the brain that is important for learning and memory. Department of Biological Sciences Assistant Professor Christine Lattin, and colleagues conducted this study of wild songbirds showing that dopamine is important in responding…

By sharing life lessons, Mizzou’s Rogers shapes future engineers

Reg Rogers should be dead. He was involved in an automobile accident with an 18-wheeler about 20 years ago and, as he tells it, was anticipated dead on arrival. But after 14 hours of surgery, he survived. Reg Rogers recently earned the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences from the American Chemical Society for the Northeast Region. The mindset of a survivor informs his life’s work as a researcher and educator, currently with the…

Nearing a new generation of pain management

The device’s smaller size and lower weight make it easier for animals to wear and move around comfortably, enabling full implantation on even small animals such as mice. Photo courtesy of Yi Zhang. Treatment of chronic pain, diabetes, nerve damage and many other debilitating diseases that affect millions globally would benefit from medicine and pain management methods targeting the source of the pain. And an interdisciplinary team, including Mizzou Engineering’s Yi Zhang, is one step closer to making such a…

Superhydrophobic ‘nanoflower’ for biomedical applications — ScienceDaily

Plant leaves have a natural superpower — they’re designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit to the biomedical field. Researchers in Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar’s lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering have developed a “lotus effect” by incorporating atomic defects…

Re-engineered device offers clinically accurate eye scans at a fraction of the cost — ScienceDaily

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States and abroad. Thanks to a redesigned, 3D-printed spectrometer, the scanner is 15 times lighter and smaller than current commercial systems and is made from parts costing less than a tenth the retail price of commercial systems — all without sacrificing imaging quality. In its first clinical trial, the new OCT scanner…

Making the ‘human-body internet’ more effective

Experiment setup to understand how characteristics of human body communication can be improved. Credit: Dairoku Muramatsu & Yoshifumi Nishida, Source: Equivalent Circuit Model Viewed from Receiver Side in Human Body Communication Wireless technologies such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have made remote connectivity easier, and as electronics become smaller and faster, the adoption of “wearables” has increased. From smart watches to implantables, such devices interact with the human body in ways that are very different from those of a computer. However,…

Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment — ScienceDaily

Mitochondria, the ‘batteries’ that produce our energy, interact with the cell’s nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science. The study, led by scientists at the University of Cambridge, suggests that matching mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA could be important when selecting potential donors for the recently-approved mitochondrial donation treatment, in order to prevent potential health problems later in life. Almost all of the DNA that makes up the human genome…

Engineering’s Nguyen turns success into Gold(water)

Julie Nguyen is one of just 496 students nationwide to earn a prestigious scholarship from the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. The research bug bit junior Julie Nguyen early. She gave lab work a whirl her freshman year to see if it was for her, and the Chesterfield native has worked in Biomedical, Biological and Chemical Engineering Assistant Professor Bret Ulery’s lab ever since. As it turns out, she’s a wiz both in the lab and on…

Mizzou senior’s NSF Graduate Fellowship a dream achieved

Sarah Gebken reached her goal when the NSF GRFP announced its 2019 recipients recently, locking in annual $34,000 stipends and $12,000 for tuition and fees each year for three years. She’ll head to Washington University in St. Louis in the fall for the next step in her evolution as an engineer. As a freshman, Mizzou Engineering undergraduate Sarah Gebken set a lofty goal — earn a spot National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program her senior year. The NSF GRFP…

Data-sampling method makes ‘sketches’ of unwieldy biological datasets while still capturing the full diversity of cell types — ScienceDaily

Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples — called “sketches” — of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies. Recent years have seen an explosion in profiling single cells from a diverse range of human tissue and organs — such as a neurons, muscles, and immune cells —…