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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Interdisciplinary team uncovers potentially groundbreaking laser application

What Vitaly Gruzdev hopes to prove in the near future is that laser technology can modify molecules in a similar way to current chemically-based methods, but without the need for sterile conditions and specific, often expensive, equipment. Photo by Amy Parris. By their nature, hypotheses are occasionally wrong. Sometimes what a researcher discovers is something entirely different from what he or she expected. In Vitaly Gruzdev’s case, what he uncovered as part of an interdisciplinary team effort to study the…

Self-powered paper-based ‘SPEDs’ may lead to new medical-diagnostic tools — ScienceDaily

A new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses — powered only by the user’s touch — and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand. “You could consider this a portable laboratory that is just completely made out of paper, is inexpensive and can be disposed of through incineration,” said Ramses V. Martinez, an assistant professor of industrial and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. “We hope…

Coulter Program announces new funding for biomedical innovations

“The Coulter Translational Partnership Program is a shining example of what an institution such as ours can do with a collaborative atmosphere and the proper resources,” said Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the MU College of Engineering. Photos by Amy Parris. Jennifer Coffman of MU Health contributed significantly to this report. On Wednesday, the University of Missouri’s Coulter Translational Partnership Program awarded five grants totaling $409,000 to help promising medical discoveries make the transition from laboratory research to commercial investment and…

Newly discovered biomarkers may lead to promising diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s — ScienceDaily

Diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease and determining a patient’s prognosis is an inexact business, and that stands in the way of better personalized care and advances in treatment. A new study from The Ohio State University has identified a potential new way of confirming the disease and predicting a patient’s outlook. First, the team of researchers discovered new physical biomarkers that could help pinpoint a diagnosis — changes to proteins found in the spinal fluid and blood of patients. In particular, as…

Goal is to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics, combat antibiotic resistance — ScienceDaily

Antibiotics are lifesaving drugs, but overuse is leading to one of the world’s most pressing health threats: antibiotic resistance. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are developing a tool to help physicians prescribe antibiotics to patients who really need them, and avoid giving them to individuals who don’t. Scientists from the University’s National Institutes of Health-funded Respiratory Pathogens Research Center identified 11 genetic markers in blood that accurately distinguished between viral and bacterial infections (antibiotics help us fight…

Pressure sensor can identify early stages of flat feet

It records the data from mobile sensors placed on an insole of a shoe. Later, it is being sent via Bluetooth connection to a computer for visualization. Credit: KTU A team of researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) have designed a device for measuring pressure on human feet. Its applications include pediatric illnesses and monitoring the physical condition of professional athletes. The most mechanical pressure is endured by the feet, which bear all of a person’s weight while walking.…

Cheap 3D printed prosthetics could be game changer for Nepal

Ram’s new hand was manufactured on a 3D printer in Nepal’s capital for just $30, an innovation that could be a game changer for many in the impoverished Himalayan country. Once a farmer, Ram lost his hands and toes within a few years of contracting leprosy, forcing the father-of-three to turn to begging in a desperate bid to feed his family. That’s where he was spotted by US-born Matthew Rockwell, the founder of Disaster Hack, a non-profit technology startup…

Diatoms have sex after all, and ammonium puts them in the mood — ScienceDaily

New research shows a species of diatom, a single-celled algae, thought to be asexual does reproduce sexually, and scientists learned it’s a common compound — ammonium — that puts the ubiquitous organism in the mood. The findings, published today in PLOS One, may be a key step toward greater understanding of the evolution of sexual behavior and also have important biotechnology implications. “Our discoveries solve two persistent mysteries that have plagued diatom researchers,” said corresponding author Kimberly Halsey, a microbiologist…

Light-scattering tool peers into pancreas to find cancer

NSF-funded researchers have developed a technique that is based on the physical principles of light scattering to non-invasively determine the properties of subcellular structures (such as cell nuclei) in organs, providing physicians with more diagnostic information. Credit: Lev T. Perelman, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard University Pancreatic cancer is difficult to detect early because the pancreas is deep inside the abdomen, making potentially cancerous cells hard to reach and identify without surgery. Researchers funded by the National Science…

Single cells lined up like ducks in a row

The new microhole chip can be populated with 200,000 single cells, each held in place in separate holes. Credit: Fraunhofer IBMT The higher the concentration of tumor cells in the bloodstream, the greater the risk of metastasis. The number of circulating tumor cells indicates how well a patient is responding to therapy. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new microhole chip that enables cells to be identified and characterized reliably within minutes. The conventional method of FACS analysis (fluorescence-activated cell sorting)…