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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Getting to the root of lavender’s secrets — ScienceDaily

A team of researchers, including UBC’s Soheil Mahmoud, have recently sequenced the genome of lavender. Mahmoud, an associate professor of biology at UBC Okanagan, says lavender has many uses, from essential oils, to fragrances, personal hygiene and pharmaceutical industries. “We have studied lavender for a long time,” says Mahmoud. “We have always been curious about this plant. Why is it drought tolerant? Why is it pest tolerant? What makes it smell so sweet?” The reason why scientists want to get…

Models of dinosaur movement could help us build stronger robots and buildings

Researchers are using computer simulations to estimate how 11 different species of extinct archosaurs such as the batrachotomus might have moved. Credit: John Hutchinson From about 245 to 66 million years ago, dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Although well-preserved skeletons give us a good idea of what they looked like, the way their limbs worked remains a bigger mystery. But computer simulations may soon provide a realistic glimpse into how some species moved and inform work in fields such as robotics,…

MOF suit shields anaerobic bacteria from oxygen in unique carbon dioxide fixation system — ScienceDaily

Just as spacesuits help astronauts survive in inhospitable environments, newly developed “spacesuits” for bacteria allow them to survive in environments that would otherwise kill them. University of California, Berkeley, chemists developed the protective suits to extend the bacteria’s lifespan in a unique system that pairs live bacteria with light-absorbing semiconductors in order to capture carbon dioxide and convert it into chemicals that can be used by industry or, someday, in space colonies. The system mimics photosynthesis in plants. But while…

Engineers add sense of touch to prosthetic hand

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Engineers at Johns Hopkins University have created an electronic skin, which when added to a prosthetic hand allows the user to feel objects as if through their own hand, including feeling pain when touching a sharp object. The research team, funded through a training grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, created an “electronic skin” which they placed over the thumb and index finger of a prosthetic hand. The skin contains biosensors in…

MU Engineering celebrates annual International Week

Organized by Lindsey Wisnewski, the College’s International Outreach Coordinator, International Week helps students learn about all the opportunities and benefits the program offers. MU’s College of Engineering invited undergraduates to study abroad and welcomed its international students during International Week. The week consisted of various events including information sessions, a lunch Q&A aimed at encouraging STEM students to go abroad and more. Organized by Lindsey Wisnewski, the College’s International Outreach Coordinator, the week helps students learn about all the opportunities…

Mizzou Engineer searches for internship

The Career Fair gave junior Taylor Sass the opportunity to market herself to potential employers and gain important insight into the atmosphere of each company. Photo by Brandan Haskell. On Tuesday, the MU College of Engineering hosted its Fall Career Fair where students had the opportunity to talk with more than 170 companies in hopes of networking or even landing a full-time job. Booths lined Mizzou Arena, which was packed full of students eager to talk with representatives from their…

Stretchy wires for the future

Credit: ACS Scientists at Duke Chemistry, NC State Engineering and the University of California – San Diego have teamed up to create stretchable, flexible wires that conduct current and change colors to indicate they’re about to reach the breaking point. Future uses could be wearable electronics, biomedical devices and soft robots. (Paper: “Mechanochromic Stretchable Electronics,” Applied Materials and Interfaces, Aug. 9, 2018) Explore further: Team develops simple hydrogel modification method toward stretchable and transparent electronics More information: Meredith H.…

Alternative treatment for peripheral artery disease — ScienceDaily

Cristina Sabliov, LSU Biological and Agricultural Engineering professor, and Tammy Dugas, professor in the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, have joined forces to fight peripheral artery disease, or PAD, an ailment affecting 8 million Americans. Thanks to a $200,495 Louisiana Board of Regents grant and $50,000 LIFT2 grant, the pair is developing an alternative treatment for PAD using a nanoparticle delivery system and nontoxic polyphenols that will give patients better options for PAD treatment with…

Self-healing reverse filter opens the door for many novel applications — ScienceDaily

A self-healing membrane that acts as a reverse filter, blocking small particles and letting large ones through, is the “straight out of science fiction” work of a team of Penn State mechanical engineers. “Conventional filters, like those used to make coffee, allow small objects to pass through while keeping larger objects contained,” said Birgitt Boschitsch, graduate student in mechanical engineering. She and the research team, however, developed the exact opposite, a stabilized liquid material that screens out smaller objects while…

Genetic error led humans to evolve bigger, but more vulnerable, brains

The skull of a Australopithecus sediba, a species of Australopithecines, who were our ancestors and whose brains started to grow two to three million years ago. Image credit – Credit: Australopithecus sediba by Brett Eloff, courtesy Profberger and Wits University is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 Newly-discovered genes that helped supersize human brains along with DNA retrieved from extinct humans, which can still be found in people living today, are expanding scientists’ understanding of how our species evolved. One of…