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Category: Biomedical Engineering

BIRDS Model uses just two inputs to predict terrestrial locomotion in extinct avian and non-avian dinosaurs — ScienceDaily

A new model based on ground-running birds could predict locomotion of bipedal dinosaurs based on their speed and body size, according to a study published February 21, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Peter Bishop from the Queensland Museum, Australia and colleagues. Previous research has investigated the biomechanics of ground-dwelling birds to better understand the how bipedal non-avian dinosaurs moved, but it has not previously been possible to empirically predict the locomotive forces that extinct dinosaurs experienced, especially…

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Credit: Northwestern University A groundbreaking new wearable designed to be worn on the throat could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation. Developed in the lab of Northwestern University engineering professor John A. Rogers, in partnership with Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, the sensor is the latest in Rogers’ growing portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise enough for use in advanced medical care and portable enough to be worn outside the hospital, even during extreme exercise. Rogers will…

MU researchers identify new genes for autism research

Chi-Ren Shyu (pictured), the Paul K. and Dianne Shumaker Endowed Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and MU Informatics Institute (MUII) director, and MUII graduate student Matt Spencer worked with researchers at MU’s Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, and the Departments of Child Health, Statistics in the School of Medicine on “Heritable genotype contrast mining reveals novel gene associations specific to autism subgroups,” recently published in the Journal of Biomedical Informatics. We all carry thousands of genes…

Neurological study reveals surprising control — ScienceDaily

Wouldn’t it be useful to suddenly erect 3D spikes out of your skin, hold them for an hour, then even faster retract them and swim away? Octopus and cuttlefish can do this as a camouflage tactic, taking on a jagged outline to mimic coral or other marine hiding spots, then flattening the skin to jet away. A new study clarifies the neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie this extraordinary defense tactic, conducted by scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL),…

Researchers develop wireless light switch for targeted cancer therapy

Researchers from the National University of Singapore developed a novel technology to wirelessly deliver light into deep regions of the body to activate light-sensitive drugs. This potentially enables photodynamic therapy to be used to treat a wider range of cancers, such as brain and liver cancer. Left to right: Assistant Professor John Ho and Professor Zhang Yong. Credit: National University of Singapore A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a way to wirelessly deliver…

Data Science and Analytics program helps social computing researchers

Sean Goggins’ goal is to help social scientists — such as sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists and more — understand computing well enough to draw valid research conclusions. The University of Missouri’s unique Data Science and Analytics master’s degree program boasts concentration areas in geospatial analysis, biotechnology, high-performance computing, data journalism/strategic communication and human-centered design for data. These areas are tailor-made for professionals looking to expand their horizons or companies looking to stay on the cutting edge of data science. The curriculum…

Developing soft biobots — ScienceDaily

UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. The study was published in Advanced Materials. The simple body design of stingrays, specifically, a flattened body shape and side fins that start at the head and end at the base of their tail, makes them ideal to model bio-electromechanical systems on. The 10-millimeter…

Stingray-inspired soft biobot

Artist’s concept of a stingray soft robot. Credit: University of California, Los Angeles UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. The study was published in Advanced Materials. The simple body design of stingrays, specifically, a flattened body shape and side fins that start at the head and end at the…

Gleaning Insights from Uber’s Partner Activity Matrix with Genomic Biclustering and Machine Learning

At Uber, machine learning plays a central role in improving user experiences across our apps. Given the scale and scope of our business, we often need to think creatively about how we design these systems. For instance, when developing our partner activity matrix, a new tool for personalizing driver experiences based on aggregate usage trends, we found inspiration in a biomedical technique for visualizing genomes (genomic biclustering). Using biclustering, we can visualize diversity in driver partner patterns by expressing each…

Deletion of a stem cell factor promotes traumatic brain injury recovery in mice — ScienceDaily

UT Southwestern molecular biologists today report the unexpected finding that selectively deleting a stem cell transcription factor in adult mice promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines TBI as a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function, ranging from mild — brief changes in mental status — to severe, marked by an extended period of unconsciousness or memory loss. In humans, most TBIs are mild and are…