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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Using sponges to wipe out cancer — ScienceDaily

A sponge found in Manado Bay, Indonesia, makes a molecule called manzamine A, which stops the growth of cervical cancer cells, according to a recent publication in the Journal of Natural Products submitted by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and their collaborators. Collaborators include students and investigators at the University of South Carolina (UofSC), College of Charleston, Gadjah Mada University in Indonesia and the University of Malaya in Malaysia. The American Cancer Society estimates that there…

New quantum technology could help diagnose and treat heart condition — ScienceDaily

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart condition that causes an irregular and abnormally fast heart rate, potentially leading to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. While the causes of AF are unknown, it affects around one million people in the UK with cases predicted to rise at a great cost to the NHS. Currently, AF is commonly diagnosed using an electrocardiogram (ECG), but this can only be done during an episode, so complementary means of diagnosis are…

A new way to study HIV’s impact on the brain — ScienceDaily

Though many negative repercussions of human immunodeficiency virus infection can be mitigated with the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), one area where medical advances haven’t made as much progress is in the reduction of cognitive impacts. Half of HIV patients have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which can manifest in a variety of ways, from forgetfulness and confusion to behavior changes and motor deficiencies. To better understand the mechanisms underlying HAND, researchers from Penn’s School of Dental Medicine and Perelman School…

A new way of making polymers adhere to surfaces may enable better biomedical sensors and implants — ScienceDaily

Polymers that are good conductors of electricity could be useful in biomedical devices, to help with sensing or electrostimulation, for example. But there has been a sticking point preventing their widespread use: their inability to adhere to a surface such as a sensor or microchip, and stay put despite moisture from the body. Now, researchers at MIT have come up with a way of getting conductive polymer gels to adhere to wet surfaces. The new adhesive method is described in…

A new approach reveals how different tissues contribute to inflammatory diseases such as ulcerative colitis — ScienceDaily

MIT biological engineers have created a multitissue model that lets them study the relationships between different organs and the immune system, on a specialized microfluidic platform seeded with human cells. Using this type of model, sometimes called “organs-on-a-chip” or “physiome-on-a-chip,” the research team was able to explore the role of circulating immune cells in ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory diseases. They also discovered that a metabolic byproduct generated by bacteria living in the human gut plays an important role under…

The End of Moore’s Law

Chandler McCoy (left) and Asst. Prof. Matthias Young constructing the thin film coating reactor in Young’s lab at Mizzou. As our electronic devices continue to grow in power and shrink in size, the semiconductor industry has been challenged to increase the number of transistors per unit. For 50 years, the industry has basically observed Moore’s Law, named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore. He observed in 1965 that the number of transistors per silicon chip doubles every year. But researchers are…

Cultural Immersion Lunch: Celebration of Black Women in Engineering One of College’s Best

Students and faculty sat together eating and discussing the “Food for Thought” prompts which addressed disparities and inequalities faced by female engineers of color. To finish out Women in Engineering Week and celebrate Black History Month, the College of Engineering held a cultural immersion lunch to highlight black women engineers. The lunch, held Feb. 21, was more interactive than past lunches and was one of the most well attended the College has had in recent years. About 30 students and…

Heated Microchip Optical Waveguide Enables Tunable Imaging Tomography

The drive to shrink advanced electro-optical medical instrumentation on-chip and in-chip continues along diverse paths. For example, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a relatively new but now widely used technique to map the back of the eye for disease assessment, such as glaucoma. It’s being extended to other internal-body imaging situations as well. [A brief tutorial: OCT uses the time-delay information contained in the light waves that have been reflected from different depths inside a sample to reconstruct a depth-profile…

Novel techniques for mining patented gene therapies offer promising treatment options — ScienceDaily

The global gene therapy market is expected to reach $13 billion by 2024 as new treatment options target cancers and other diseases. Now, a team of scientists from Purdue University and other research institutions around the world have come together to better understand the growing number of worldwide patented innovations available for gene therapy treatment. They specifically focus on nonviral methods, which use synthetic or natural compounds or physical forces to deliver materials generally less toxic than their viral counterparts…

Scientists solve structure enabling cyanobacteria to thrive in low light — ScienceDaily

Scientists have determined the structure of the protein complex that gives cyanobacteria their unique ability to convert weak, filtered sunlight into useable energy. Their findings could one day be used to engineer crops that thrive under low-light conditions. Tiny photosynthetic organisms that live virtually everywhere on earth, cyanobacteria helped to create an oxygen-rich atmosphere on earth and continue to provide us with much of the oxygen that we need to survive. “When cyanobacteria live in low-light conditions, such as beneath…