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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Dutch design lab blends naturalistic and futuristic

This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) The first U.S. museum exhibit devoted solely to the experimental and futuristic work of Dutch design studio Joris Laarman Lab is now on view at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum here. The works—mainly furniture, along with an unusual radiator and a newly…

New methods tackle a perplexing engineering concept

Sreekalyan Patiballa, left, and professor Girish Krishnan have developed a new, award-winning conceptual model to better define the complicated concept of auxetic materials. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer Researchers at the University of Illinois are working to turn a complex materials design problem into an intuitive concept, understandable to engineers from novice to advanced experience levels. The group developed guidelines to help understand materials engineered to become thicker when stretched. This highly useful property, which is not commonly found in nature,…

Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing

Credit: Shutterstock Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have designed a smart bandage that could eventually heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries with every fiber of its being. The bandage consists of electrically conductive fibers coated in a gel that can be individually loaded with infection-fighting antibiotics, tissue-regenerating growth factors, painkillers or other medications. A microcontroller no larger than a postage stamp, which could be triggered by a smartphone or other wireless device, sends…

Painless microneedles extract fluid for wearable sensors for soldiers, athletes

Sandia National Laboratories materials scientist Ronen Polsky positions a prototype 3-D-printed microneedle holder on the arm of Sandia science writer Mollie Rappe. Rappe participated in a clinical trial to see the best length of needle to extract the interstitial fluid on the path to track the physiological condition of soldiers. Credit: Randy Montoya The lab is calm and quiet, clean and well organized; boxes of tiny needles and sample tubes are neatly stacked above a pristine paper-covered countertop. This is…

Genes which determine animal complexity, or what makes humans so much more complex than a fruit fly or a sea urchin, have been identified for the first time — ScienceDaily

Genes which determine animal complexity — or what makes humans so much more complex than a fruit fly or a sea urchin — have been identified for the first time. The secret mechanism for how a cell in one animal can be significantly more complex than a similar cell in another animal appears to be due to proteins and their ability to control ‘events’ in a cell’s nucleus. The research, by biochemist Dr Colin Sharpe and colleagues in the University…

Interdisciplinary team uncovers potentially groundbreaking laser application

What Vitaly Gruzdev hopes to prove in the near future is that laser technology can modify molecules in a similar way to current chemically-based methods, but without the need for sterile conditions and specific, often expensive, equipment. Photo by Amy Parris. By their nature, hypotheses are occasionally wrong. Sometimes what a researcher discovers is something entirely different from what he or she expected. In Vitaly Gruzdev’s case, what he uncovered as part of an interdisciplinary team effort to study the…

Self-powered paper-based ‘SPEDs’ may lead to new medical-diagnostic tools — ScienceDaily

A new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses — powered only by the user’s touch — and reads out the color-coded test results, making it easy for non-experts to understand. “You could consider this a portable laboratory that is just completely made out of paper, is inexpensive and can be disposed of through incineration,” said Ramses V. Martinez, an assistant professor of industrial and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. “We hope…

Newly discovered biomarkers may lead to promising diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s — ScienceDaily

Diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease and determining a patient’s prognosis is an inexact business, and that stands in the way of better personalized care and advances in treatment. A new study from The Ohio State University has identified a potential new way of confirming the disease and predicting a patient’s outlook. First, the team of researchers discovered new physical biomarkers that could help pinpoint a diagnosis — changes to proteins found in the spinal fluid and blood of patients. In particular, as…

Goal is to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics, combat antibiotic resistance — ScienceDaily

Antibiotics are lifesaving drugs, but overuse is leading to one of the world’s most pressing health threats: antibiotic resistance. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are developing a tool to help physicians prescribe antibiotics to patients who really need them, and avoid giving them to individuals who don’t. Scientists from the University’s National Institutes of Health-funded Respiratory Pathogens Research Center identified 11 genetic markers in blood that accurately distinguished between viral and bacterial infections (antibiotics help us fight…