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Category: Biomedical Engineering

Mizzou, UM System ready to lead precision medicine revolution

Jamie Arndt, second from left, addresses a question as fellow panelists (from left) Sheila Grant, Rob Paul, Satish Nair, Mike Nichols and Peter Tonellato look on during Wednesday’s Precision Medicine Summit. Photos by Brandan Haskell. Precision medicine is the future, and Mizzou is ready to lead. MU hosted the Precision Medicine Summit on Wednesday, which brought exceptional faculty from MU as well as Missouri-Kansas City, Missouri-St. Louis, and Missouri S&T to highlight the breadth and quality of translational precision medicine…

Technology enables soft contact lenses to monitor glucose, medical conditions and deliver medications

Purdue University researchers combined a commercial soft contact lens with an ultrathin conformal sensor circuit. Credit: Purdue University Purdue University researchers have developed soft contact lenses that not only correct vision but also can monitor glucose and medical conditions and be used for ocular pain relief or drug delivery. Sensors or other technology previously couldn’t be used for soft contact lenses because the technology required a rigid, planar surface incompatible with the soft, curved shape of a contact lens. …

How dragonfly larvae could inspire more effective artificial heart valves

Exuvia of a larva of a dragonfly. Credit: Public Domain The way dragonfly larvae control the water jets they use to move and breathe could have a range of engineering and medical applications, according to new research. Published today in Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, the study from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), examined how Anisopteran dragonfly larvae control and adjust the repetitive water jets flowing through their posterior openings. The larvae have active tri-leaflet valves, with independent control over…

AI-based method could speed development of specialized nanoparticles — ScienceDaily

A new technique developed by MIT physicists could someday provide a way to custom-design multilayered nanoparticles with desired properties, potentially for use in displays, cloaking systems, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists tackle a variety of thorny research problems, in ways that could in some cases be orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. The innovation uses computational neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, to “learn” how a nanoparticle’s structure affects its behavior, in this case the…

Dolphin algorithm could lead to better medical ultrasounds

Millions of years of evolutionary fine-tuning have made dolphins phenomenally good at using echolocation to orient themselves, find food and communicate with one another. But how do they actually do it? New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that they emit two intertwined ultrasound beam components at different frequencies—and with slightly different timing. This new knowledge brings us one step closer to solving the puzzle. A few years ago, Josefin Starkhammar, a researcher in biomedical engineering at Lund University,…

MU Engineering alum uncovers a GEM

Dominic Romero’s hard work led him to great success both in the classroom and in the lab of Bioengineering Professor Sheila Grant during his time at Mizzou. And that hard work landed the recent MU Engineering alum a prestigious fellowship as he works to further his education. Dominic Romero recently was selected as a GEM Fellow, landing a $8,000 living stipend per semester, up to two paid summer internships with a GEM employer member and full tuition and fees at…

In mice, the same changes to sperm miRNAs occur and are transmitted to the next generation — ScienceDaily

Exposure to early life trauma can lead to poor physical and mental health in some individuals, which can be passed on to their children. Studies in mice show that at least some of the effects of stress can be transmitted to offspring via environmentally-induced changes in sperm miRNA levels. A new epigenetics study raises the possibility that the same is true in humans. It shows for the first time that the levels of the same two sperm miRNAs change in…

Graphene surface allows researchers to control cell behavior with light — a technique that could speed the search for more precise, less toxic therapeutic drugs — ScienceDaily

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes. The method, described in the May 18…

Emergency contact info helps researchers branch out family tree — ScienceDaily

When you go to the doctor or hospital, one piece of information that you’re always asked to provide — in addition to your name, address, and insurance information — is an emergency contact. Often, that person is a blood relative. Now, a collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals’ electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. Those family…

MU’s Xu lands unique NIH grant

Most approved research grants have a very limited focus, with funding going toward achieving a very specific goal and that goal only. The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) wanted to turn that idea on its head by finding worthwhile bodies of research to fund — in other words, if its related to a researcher’s general research topic, this money can support it. Dong Xu, interim co-chair of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department…