.advertise@offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

.www.offshoreoiljobs.co.uk

Category: Aerospace Engineering

Using a camera to spot and track drones

EPFL researchers have developed algorithms capable of detecting and tracking small flying objects using a simple camera. Credit: istock EPFL researchers have shown that a simple camera can detect and track flying drones. Plus, the lightweight, energy-efficient and inexpensive technology could be installed directly on the drones themselves and enhance safety in the skies. The rising number of drones in air space poses numerous challenges. Topping that list is our ability to simply detect these small unmanned aerial vehicles. Periodic…

Very Low Frequency Radio Waves Protect Earth » Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog

Very Low Frequency Radio Waves Protect Earth Posted on August 5, 2017  Comments (0) Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio communications signals are transmitted from ground stations at huge powers to communicate with submarines deep in the ocean. While these waves are intended for communications below the surface, they also extend out beyond our atmosphere, shrouding Earth in a VLF bubble. This bubble is even seen by spacecraft high above Earth’s surface, such as NASA’s Van Allen Probes, which study electrons…

Large, distant comets more common than previously thought — ScienceDaily

Comets that take more than 200 years to make one revolution around the sun are notoriously difficult to study. Because they spend most of their time far from our area of the solar system, many “long-period comets” will never approach the sun in a person’s lifetime. In fact, those that travel inward from the Oort Cloud — a group of icy bodies beginning roughly 300 billion kilometers away from the sun — can have periods of thousands or even millions…

Strengthening 3-D printed parts for real-world use

Credit: Texas A&M University From aerospace and defense to digital dentistry and medical devices, 3-D printed parts are used in a variety of industries. Currently, 3-D printed parts are very fragile and only used in the prototyping phase of materials or as a toy for display. A doctoral student in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University has pioneered a countermeasure to transform the landscape of 3-D printing today. Brandon Sweeney and his advisor Dr. Micah…

Does the U. S. Need a New Star Wars Program?

On the Fourth of July last week, the world saw one rocket’s red glare that wasn’t fired in celebration:  North Korea launched the latest in a series of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests.  The timing was intentional, and the North Korean news agency quoted its leader Kim Jong-un as saying, “The American bastards must be quite unhappy after watching our strategic decision.”  Not exactly diplomatic language.  Although the test missile went mostly straight up and down and landed harmlessly in…

UK pilots warn of disaster, seek tougher rules for drones

The British Airline Pilots Association is warning of a looming catastrophe unless drones are subject to tougher regulations. The association demanded the compulsory registration of drones Monday after Gatwick Airport briefly closed its runway over safety concerns when a drone was spotted in the area. Authorities diverted four EasyJet flights. One British Airways flight was sent to Bournemouth Airport. The union’s flight safety specialist, Steve Landells, says the incident shows “the threat of drones being flown near manned…

Mars rover opportunity on walkabout near rim — ScienceDaily

NASA’s senior Mars rover, Opportunity, is examining rocks at the edge of Endeavour Crater for signs that they may have been either transported by a flood or eroded in place by wind. Those scenarios are among the possible explanations rover-team scientists are considering for features seen just outside the crater rim’s crest above “Perseverance Valley,” which is carved into the inner slope of the rim. The team plans to drive Opportunity down Perseverance Valley after completing a “walkabout” survey of…

NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways — ScienceDaily

Wherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception. That generally is not a problem. For one thing, the space station is kept cleaner than many environments on Earth. Routine cleaning activities are included on astronaut task schedules. Cargo sent to the station, and the vehicles that carry it, undergo a rigorous cleaning process and monitoring for microorganisms before launch. Crew members assigned to the space station spend 10 days in…

Origins of Sun’s swirling spicules discovered — ScienceDaily

At any given moment, as many as 10 million wild jets of solar material burst from the sun’s surface. They erupt as fast as 60 miles per second, and can reach lengths of 6,000 miles before collapsing. These are spicules, and despite their grass-like abundance, scientists didn’t understand how they form. Now, for the first time, a computer simulation — so detailed it took a full year to run — shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can…