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Author: engineering

Panasonic develops unique vacuum insulated glass based on its plasma display panel technology

Credit: Panasonic Panasonic Corporation today announced it has developed and succeeded in mass production of thin, high-performance vacuum insulated glass by applying technologies the company accumulated in the development and manufacturing of plasma display panels (PDPs). The glass achieves a heat transfer coefficient (Ug value) of 0.7 (W/m²K), the industry’s top-class insulation performance for glass with a total thickness of 6 mm, which is equal to or greater than triple glass containing argon gas with a total thickness of about…

Project aim at reducing cost of hydrogen fuel cells — ScienceDaily

Replacing your everyday gas guzzler with a hydrogen fueled car could drastically reduce your carbon footprint. So why don’t we all make the switch? One of reasons we don’t is the expensive platinum catalyst required to operate hydrogen fuel cells efficiently. Research led by Sandia National Laboratories and the University of California, Merced aim at bringing down the cost of hydrogen fuel cells by using a dirt-cheap compound to create an uneven surface that resembles a plant’s leaves. The additional…

Introducing the Cloudflare Warp Ingress Controller for Kubernetes

It’s ironic that the one thing most programmers would really rather not have to spend time dealing with is… a computer. When you write code it’s written in your head, transferred to a screen with your fingers and then it has to be run. On. A. Computer. Ugh. Of course, code has to be run and typed on a computer so programmers spend hours configuring and optimizing shells, window managers, editors, build systems, IDEs, compilation times and more so they…

A smart, portable and miniaturized system that can analyze sweat

Credit: EPFL / Alain Herzog EPFL researchers have teamed up with startup Xsensio to develop a tiny, fully portable system that can encapsulate and analyze biomarkers in a person’s sweat. The low-power system, which fits on a chip measuring under 1 cm2, was presented this week at the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco. The miniature chip was developed by researchers at EPFL’s Nanoelectronic Devices Laboratory (Nanolab), headed by Professor Adrian Ionescu, working in association with startup Xsensio.…

Exploring fluid dynamics in virtual reality

Anything that moves through water or air leaves behind an invisible wake of swirls and waves. Flow visualization makes these “flow field” patterns visible to allow researchers to study them. Credit: Syracuse University Virtual reality has grown beyond the gaming world and is increasingly being used for a variety of applications—including education. Researchers in Assistant Professor Melissa Green’s Flow Visualization Lab in the College of Engineering and Computer Science are developing a way to apply it to their work. This…

Things You Should Know About Arc Flashing at High Voltages

Arc flashing is a serious issue in electrical systems involving medium and high AC voltages. Any time there is a electrical system that utilizes high voltages, the design of the wires must include thick enough insulation to prevent a flash over from occurring. Unfortunately, preventing this from occurring does not end after the design. There are many reasons that arcing can happen. The following are a few things to understand about this phenomenon as well as a few things to…

IPvlan overlay-free Kubernetes Networking in AWS

Lyft is pleased to announce the initial open source release of our IPvlan-based CNI networking stack for running Kubernetes at scale in AWS. cni-ipvlan-vpc-k8s provides a set of CNI and IPAM plugins implementing a simple, fast, and low latency networking stack for running Kubernetes within Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs) on AWS. Background Today Lyft runs in AWS with Envoy as our service mesh but without using containers in production. We use a home-grown, somewhat bespoke stack to deploy our microservice…

Trickle-down is the solution (to the planetary core formation problem) — ScienceDaily

Scientists have long pondered how rocky bodies in the solar system — including our own Earth — got their metal cores. According to research conducted by The University of Texas at Austin, evidence points to the downwards percolation of molten metal toward the center of the planet through tiny channels between grains of rock. The finding calls into question the interpretation of prior experiments and simulations that sought to understand how metals behave under intense heat and pressure when planets…

NEST360’s low-cost jaundice detector passes first test in Africa

BiliSpec is a low-cost, battery-powered reader designed to diagnose jaundice by immediately quantifying serum bilirubin levels from a small drop of whole blood. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University The first clinical study of a low-cost, hand-held jaundice detector invented by Rice University students couldn’t have come at a better time for NEST360°, an international team of scientists, doctors and global health experts preparing for a Dec. 11 competition for $100 million from the MacArthur Foundation. The money would allow the team to…

With the right tools, we can mine cities

Cities like Melbourne are a store for such huge amounts of resources that they could be used as urban mines. Credit: Donaldytong (own work)/Wikimedia From 1900 to 2010, the amount of materials accumulated in buildings and infrastructure across the world increased 23-fold. We are depleting our resources at unprecedented rates. Instead of extracting dwindling raw materials from nature at ever-increasing cost, the time has come to start re-using materials from buildings and infrastructure in our cities. We have been working…